Disclaimer

If you do not know me (I mean, really know me) then there is something you need to understand before you read this blog: I value the truth above everything else... except a good laugh. A good laugh will almost always beat the truth as far as I’m concerned. Everything you read on this blog will be true, somewhat true, or something I made up in an effort to get a laugh. Sometimes I will go on a rant that I don’t really mean (or only kind of mean). Sometimes I will mean what I write only to completely change my mind a year, month, or day later. Such is life. By reading this blog you agree not to get offended by anything I write (or, at the very least, you agree not to tell me or anyone else that you are offended). It is worth noting that my employer does not endorse my blog (or even read it, to tell you the truth). The Wife also does not endorse my blog (though she will read it from time to time). I am not paid to write this... it’s just my way of giving back to the community. I have, and will, touch on a wide range of subjects and will give my opinion on these subjects. Again, most of what I say is for laughs but every now and then I will say what I really think and feel (see my views on Westboro Baptist Cult). How will you know when I’m serious and when I’m trying to get a laugh? You’ll know. And if you don’t know, well... maybe this isn’t the best thing for you to be reading. So, sit back, read and enjoy. Leave comments if you want and don’t be afraid to publicly follow me.



Friday, November 30, 2012

Know Your South Carolina Athlete

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Seaman John Johnson (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on April 12, 1872, on board the USS Kansas. His citation reads:

Serving on board the U.S.S. Kansas near Greytown, Nicaragua 12 April 1872, Johnson displayed great coolness and self-possession ai the time Comdr. A. F. Crosman and others were drowned and, by extraordinary heroism and personal exertion, prevented greater loss of life.

First Lieutenant Joseph E. Johnson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 29, 1864, at Fort Harrison, Virginia. His citation reads:

Though twice severely wounded while advancing in the assault, he disregarded his injuries and was among the first to enter the fort, where he was wounded for the third time.

Colonel Leon W. Johnson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 1, 1943, at Ploesti Raid, Rumania. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry in action and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty on 1 August 1943. Col. Johnson, as commanding officer of a heavy bombardment group, let the formation of the aircraft of his organization constituting the fourth element of the mass low-level bombing attack of the 9th U.S. Air Force against the vitally important enemy target of the Ploesti oil refineries. While proceeding to the target on this 2,400-mile flight, his element became separated from the leading elements of the mass formation in maintaining the formation of the unit while avoiding dangerous cumulous cloud conditions encountered over mountainous territory. Though temporarily lost, he reestablished contact with the third element and continued on the mission with this reduced force to the prearranged point of attack, where it was discovered that the target assigned to Col. Johnson's group had been attacked and damaged by a preceding element. Though having lost the element of surprise upon which the safety and success of such a daring form of mission in heavy bombardment aircraft so strongly depended, Col. Johnson elected to carry out his planned low-level attack despite the thoroughly alerted defenses, the destructive antiaircraft fire, enemy fighter airplanes, the imminent danger of exploding delayed action bombs from the previous element, of oil fires and explosions, and of intense smoke obscuring the target. By his gallant courage, brilliant leadership, and superior flying skill, Col. Johnson so led his formation as to destroy totally the important refining plants and installations which were the object of his mission. Col. Johnson's personal contribution to the success of this historic raid, and the conspicuous gallantry in action, and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty demonstrated by him on this occasion constitute such deeds of valor and distinguished service as have during our Nation's history formed the finest traditions of our Armed Forces.


The I’m just sayin… Know Your South Carolina Athlete

The South Carolina athlete we are going to look at today is FSU great Peter Boulware. Peter Nicholas Boulware (born December 18, 1974) is a former college and professional football player who was a linebacker in the National Football League for nine seasons. He played college football for Florida State University, and was recognized as an All-American. A first-round pick of the Baltimore Ravens in the 1997 NFL Draft, he played his entire pro career for the Ravens.

Boulware was born in Columbia, South Carolina. He played at Heathwood Hall Episcopal School, and then graduated first from Spring Valley High School, and went on to play for Florida State University. He was an all-state pick for Spring Valley High School in 1992. He recorded 132 tackles, 14 sacks, and two blocked punts and was named one of the top 50 athletes in the nation by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He was also named one of the nation's top 100 athletes by the Dallas Morning News.

Boulware accepted an athletic scholarship to attend Florida State University, where he played for coach Bobby Bowden's Florida State Seminoles football team from 1993 to 1996. He redshirted his freshman season in 1993; as a redshirt freshman in 1994, he recorded 37 tackles, five sacks, and five tackles for loss. One of his sacks was recorded against Florida Gators quarterback Danny Wuerffel in the 1995 Sugar Bowl. As a sophomore, Boulware totaled 46 tackles, an ACC-leading ten sacks, and 18 tackles for losses, which ranked second in the ACC, and was named honorable mention All-ACC. As a junior, Boulware totaled 68 tackles, a school record 19 sacks, 20 tackles for losses, seven forced fumbles, and three fumble recoveries. He was a consensus first-team All-American, All-ACC, ACC Defensive Player of the Year, as well as National Defensive Player of the Year by Football News. His 19 sacks were the most in the nation. Boulware decided to leave school early and enter the 1997 NFL Draft. Boulware graduated on April 26, 1997 with a degree in management information systems.

The Baltimore Ravens selected Boulware in the first round, with the fourth overall pick in the 1997 NFL Draft. In 1997 Boulware recorded 66 total tackles, 12 sacks, and one forced fumble to receive the NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year by the Associated Press. He would play for the Ravens for eight years, going to four Pro Bowls and becoming the Ravens' all-time sack leader. Boulware was also a member of the Baltimore Ravens' Super Bowl-winning team during the 2000 NFL season. The Ravens released Peter Boulware prior to the 2005 season, then re-signed him to a lower salary. Before the 2006 season, the Ravens released him again due to injuries and he decided to retire. Boulware finished his career with 493 tackles, a franchise record 70 sacks, 26.5 tackles for losses, 13 forced fumbles, five fumble recoveries, 19 pass deflections, and one interception for six yards in 126 career games. Peter Boulware was officially inducted into the Baltimore Ravens' Ring of Honor in a ceremony held during halftime of the game between the Ravens and the Bengals on November 5, 2006.

On September 10, 2007, Peter Boulware announced his candidacy for the Florida state house as a member of the Republican Party. On August 26, 2008, Boulware won the Republican primary with 84.1 percent of the vote. On November 7, with all ballots counted from the election held on November 4, Democrat Michelle Rehwinkle Vasilinda beat Boulware by 430 votes, for an open Florida House seat. Following the election Boulware was appointed to the Florida Board of Education by Governor Charlie Crist.

Congrats to Peter Boulware for being our SC Athlete You Should Know.


Thanks for the info Wikipedia!

Thursday, November 29, 2012

LCS

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Sergeant Henry Johnson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on October 2-5, 1879, at Milk River, Colorado. His citation reads:

Voluntarily left fortified shelter and under heavy fire at close range made the rounds of the pits to instruct the guards, fought his way to the creek and back to bring water to the wounded.

Sergeant James E. Johnson (US Marine Corps) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on December 2, 1950, at Yudam-ni, Korea. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a squad leader in a provisional rifle platoon composed of artillerymen and attached to Company J, in action against enemy aggressor forces. Vastly outnumbered by a well-entrenched and cleverly concealed enemy force wearing the uniforms of friendly troops and attacking his platoon's open and unconcealed positions, Sgt. Johnson unhesitatingly took charge of his platoon in the absence of the leader and, exhibiting great personal valor in the face of a heavy barrage of hostile fire, coolly proceeded to move about among his men, shouting words of encouragement and inspiration and skillfully directing their fire. Ordered to displace his platoon during the fire fight, he immediately placed himself in an extremely hazardous position from which he could provide covering fire for his men. Fully aware that his voluntary action meant either certain death or capture to himself, he courageously continued to provide effective cover for his men and was last observed in a wounded condition single-handedly engaging enemy troops in close hand grenade and hand-to-hand fighting. By his valiant and inspiring leadership, Sgt. Johnson was directly responsible for the successful completion of the platoon's displacement and the saving of many lives. His dauntless fighting spirit and unfaltering devotion to duty in the face of terrific odds reflect the highest credit upon himself and the U.S. Naval Service.

Private John Johnson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on December 13, 1862, at Fredericksburg, Virginia. His citation reads:

Conspicuous gallantry in battle in which he was severely wounded. While serving as cannoneer he manned the positions of fallen gunners.


The Living Christmas Story starts tonight at Bethany United Methodist Church in Summerville.  Come on out and see what all the fuss is about.


Thankful Thursday

Today I am thankful that a long time ago in a city far away, I surprised myself and decided to pledge Kappa Sigma. The surprise wasn’t so much going Kappa Sigma, it was more the fact that I was going to join any fraternity. I had already decided that I wasn’t going to join a bunch of hazing jerks… and looking back, I guess that was true. I didn’t join a bunch of hazing jerks. I joined a group of guys who, for the most part, had all thought they were never going to join a fraternity. I can’t say that I’m best friends with all of my fraternity brothers, but if you know me then you know that’s probably as much my fault as it is theirs. Still, as a whole, they are the best group of guys I know. A lot of times you hear people say joining a fraternity is just “paying for your friends”. If that is the case, it’s the best damn money I’ve ever spent. All of my friendships from college except one can probably be tied back in some way to Kappa Sigma. And that one exception is one of the biggest reasons I decided to join the fraternity. It’s easy to look back and see all the mistakes I’ve made… times I did this when I should have done that. But this is one decision I can look back on and smile knowing that I got it 100% right. And for that, I am thankful.


No one could tell me where my soul might be;
  I searched for God but He eluded me;
    I sought my brother out and found all three.

                 -Ernest Howard Crosby

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Living Christmas Story

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Private Elden H. Johnson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on June 3, 1944, near Valmontone, Italy. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. Pvt. Johnson elected to sacrifice his life in order that his comrades might extricate themselves from an ambush. Braving the massed fire of about 60 riflemen, 3 machineguns, and 3 tanks from positions only 25 yards distant, he stood erect and signaled his patrol leader to withdraw. The whole area was brightly illuminated by enemy flares. Then, despite 20mm. machineguns, machine pistol, and rifle fire directed at him, Pvt. Johnson advanced beyond the enemy in a slow deliberate walk. Firing his automatic rifle from the hip, he succeeded in distracting the enemy and enabled his 12 comrades to escape. Advancing to within 5 yards of a machinegun, emptying his weapon, Pvt. Johnson killed its crew. Standing in full view of the enemy he reloaded and turned on the riflemen to the left, firing directly into their positions. He either killed or wounded 4 of them. A burst of machinegun fire tore into Pvt. Johnson and he dropped to his knees. Fighting to the very last, he steadied himself on his knees and sent a final burst of fire crashing into another German. With that he slumped forward dead. Pvt. Johnson had willingly given his life in order that his comrades might live. These acts on the part of Pvt. Johnson were an inspiration to the entire command and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the armed forces.

Corporal Follett Johnson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 27, 1864, at New Hope Church, Georgia. His citation reads:

Voluntarily exposed himself to the fire of a Confederate sharpshooter, thus drawing fire upon himself and enabling his comrade to shoot the sharpshooter.

Seaman Henry Johnson (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 5, 1864, on board the USS Metacomet. His citation reads:

As seaman on board the U.S.S. Metacomet, Johnson served as a member of the boat's crew which went to the rescue of the U.S. Monitor Tecumseh when that vessel was struck by a torpedo in passing the enemy forts in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. He braved the enemy fire which was said by the admiral to be "one of the most galling" he had ever seen, and aided in rescuing from death 10 of the crew of the Tecumseh, thereby eliciting the admiration of both friend and foe.


Come out to Bethany United Methodist Church tomorrow night to see the Living Christmas Story. I’ll be there for the first part of the night… maybe even the whole night. The LCS will be going on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights… make sure you check it out.


The I’m just sayin… Quote of the Week

Do not permit what you cannot do to interfere with what you can do. - Coach John Wooden

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

HAPPY BIRTHDAY ALLISON!!!!!

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Chief Machinist Hans Johnsen (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 11, 1898, on board the torpedo boat Winslow. His citation reads:

On board the torpedo boat Winslow during the action at Cardenas, Cuba, 11 May 1898. Showing great presence of mind, Johnsen turned off the steam from the engine which had been wrecked by a shell bursting in the cylinder.

Private Andrew Johnson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Mississippi. His citation reads:

Gallantry in the charge of the "volunteer storming party."

Specialist Fifth Class Dwight H. Johnson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on January 15, 1968, near Dak To, Kontum Province, Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Sp5c. Johnson, a tank driver with Company B, was a member of a reaction force moving to aid other elements of his platoon, which was in heavy contact with a battalion size North Vietnamese force. Sp5c. Johnson's tank, upon reaching the point of contact, threw a track and became immobilized. Realizing that he could do no more as a driver, he climbed out of the vehicle, armed only with a .45 caliber pistol. Despite intense hostile fire, Sp5c. Johnson killed several enemy soldiers before he had expended his ammunition. Returning to his tank through a heavy volume of antitank rocket, small arms and automatic weapons fire, he obtained a sub-machine gun with which to continue his fight against the advancing enemy. Armed with this weapon, Sp5c. Johnson again braved deadly enemy fire to return to the center of the ambush site where he courageously eliminated more of the determined foe. Engaged in extremely close combat when the last of his ammunition was expended, he killed an enemy soldier with the stock end of his submachine gun. Now weaponless, Sp5c. Johnson ignored the enemy fire around him, climbed into his platoon sergeant's tank, extricated a wounded crewmember and carried him to an armored personnel carrier. He then returned to the same tank and assisted in firing the main gun until it jammed. In a magnificent display of courage, Sp5c. Johnson exited the tank and again armed only with a .45 caliber pistol, engaged several North Vietnamese troops in close proximity to the vehicle. Fighting his way through devastating fire and remounting his own immobilized tank, he remained fully exposed to the enemy as he bravely and skillfully engaged them with the tank's externally-mounted .50 caliber machine gun; where he remained until the situation was brought under control. Sp5c. Johnson's profound concern for his fellow soldiers, at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the U.S. Army.


Today we would like to wish my oldest niece Allison (daughter of Sonny) a VERY Happy Birthday!!! We hope she has a great one… though with that cheap daddy of hers, I’d guess the odds of that happening are 50/50 at best. Sorry, I'm just "keeping it real" as the kids like to say (at least, I'm pretty sure they still like to say that).

Happy Birthday Allison!  I love you (even if I can't still hold you like this)!!
 
 
Picture Tuesday
 
Look who lost another tooth!

Goofy

Mary Ruth trying to do her homework but I keep trying to take her picture

Not sure how well you can see this... It's a picture of Daniel and Susie in my car after The Wife told them they had to go home with me while she went somewhere else.  Daniel is crying while Susie is making a funny face trying to get him to laugh.  Maybe she is mine after all...

I'm not sure if you can tell, but he's happy here.  Probably because I'm letting him play with something that isn't his.

He ate everything I fixed for him

And now he wants more.  Too bad... Haha

Susie and Daniel playing... which means he's doing what she tells him to do.


Still goofy

 



Aunt Yvonne working on an afghan with my four favorite colors: Blue, Orange, Garnet and Gold... She loves me (even if it does kill her to put those four colors together).
 

Monday, November 26, 2012

Congrats Carolina!

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Private Franklin Johndro (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 30, 1864, at Chapins Farm, Virginia. His citation reads:

Capture of 40 prisoners.

Corporal Elisha Johns (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Mississippi. His citation reads:

Gallantry in the charge of the "volunteer storming party."

Private Henry T. Johns (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 27, 1863, at Port Hudson, Louisiana. His citation reads:

Volunteered in response to a call and took part in the movement that was made upon the enemy's works under a heavy fire therefrom ?of a mile in advance of the general assault.


Congrats to the Revolutionary War Heroes on doing something that hasn’t been done since before Dad was in college… win their 4th straight game over Clemson!  I wanted Clemson to win, but I think the better team got the W this past Saturday night. Maybe the teams will be just as good heading into the game next year.

It was my hope that I would be posting a more orange-ish picture today, but since the Revolutionary War Heroes won the game, I'm posting this pic.



The I’m just sayin… Weekly Weigh-In

Greg 236

Mary Ruth 50

Susie 31

Daniel 26

Sunday, November 25, 2012

The day after...

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Seaman John P. Johanson (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 11, 1898, on board the USS Marblehead. His citation reads:

On board the U.S.S. Marblehead during the operation of cutting the cable leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, 11 May 1898. Facing the heavy fire of the enemy, Johanson set an example of extraordinary bravery and coolness throughout this action.

Ordinary Seaman Johan J. Johansson (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 11, 1898, on board the USS Nashville. His citation reads:

On board the U.S.S. Nashville during the operation of cutting the cable leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, 11 May 1898. Facing the heavy fire of the enemy, Johansson set an example of extraordinary bravery and coolness throughout this action.

Private William John (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Mississppi. His citation reads:

Gallantry in the charge of the "volunteer storming party."


We'll have more on the big game tomorrow or Tuesday...


The I’m just sayin… Bible Verse of the Week
COLOSSIANS 3:17

And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.

Saturday, November 24, 2012

The big game…

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Lance Corporal Jose Francisco Jimenez (US Marine Corps) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 28, 1969, at Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a fire team leader with Company K, in operations against the enemy. L/Cpl. Jimenez' unit came under heavy attack by North Vietnamese soldiers concealed in well camouflaged emplacements. L/Cpl. Jimenez reacted by seizing the initiative and plunging forward toward the enemy positions. He personally destroyed several enemy personnel and silenced an antiaircraft weapon. Shouting encouragement to his companions, L/Cpl. Jimenez continued his aggressive forward movement. He slowly maneuvered to within 10 feet of hostile soldiers who were firing automatic weapons from a trench and, in the face of vicious enemy fire, destroyed the position. Although he was by now the target of concentrated fire from hostile gunners intent upon halting his assault, L/Cpl. Jimenez continued to press forward. As he moved to attack another enemy soldier, he was mortally wounded. L/Cpl. Jimenez' indomitable courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unfaltering devotion to duty upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the U.S. Naval Service.

Specialist Sixth Class Lawrence Joel (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on November 8, 1965, in the Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. Sp6c. Joel demonstrated indomitable courage, determination, and professional skill when a numerically superior and well-concealed Viet Cong element launched a vicious attack which wounded or killed nearly every man in the lead squad of the company. After treating the men wounded by the initial burst of gunfire, he bravely moved forward to assist others who were wounded while proceeding to their objective. While moving from man to man, he was struck in the right leg by machine gun fire. Although painfully wounded his desire to aid his fellow soldiers transcended all personal feeling. He bandaged his own wound and self-administered morphine to deaden the pain enabling him to continue his dangerous undertaking. Through this period of time, he constantly shouted words of encouragement to all around him. Then, completely ignoring the warnings of others, and his pain, he continued his search for wounded, exposing himself to hostile fire; and, as bullets dug up the dirt around him, he held plasma bottles high while kneeling completely engrossed in his life saving mission. Then, after being struck a second time and with a bullet lodged in his thigh, he dragged himself over the battlefield and succeeded in treating 13 more men before his medical supplies ran out. Displaying resourcefulness, he saved the life of 1 man by placing a plastic bag over a severe chest wound to congeal the blood. As 1 of the platoons pursued the Viet Cong, an insurgent force in concealed positions opened fire on the platoon and wounded many more soldiers. With a new stock of medical supplies, Sp6c. Joel again shouted words of encouragement as he crawled through an intense hail of gunfire to the wounded men. After the 24 hour battle subsided and the Viet Cong dead numbered 410, snipers continued to harass the company. Throughout the long battle, Sp6c. Joel never lost sight of his mission as a medical aidman and continued to comfort and treat the wounded until his own evacuation was ordered. His meticulous attention to duty saved a large number of lives and his unselfish, daring example under most adverse conditions was an inspiration to all. Sp6c. Joel's profound concern for his fellow soldiers, at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the U.S. Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.

Chief Watertender Johannes J. Johannessen (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on January 25, 1905, on board the USS Iowa. His citation reads:

Serving on board the U.S.S. Iowa, for extraordinary heroism at the time of the blowing out of the manhole plate of boiler D on board that vessel, 25 January 1905.


A reminder to all of you Clemson/USC fans… Trust me when I say that I “get it”… this is “more than just a game”. But really, it’s not worth killing over. Or really even fighting (physically) over. Talk trash and all of that… but every year or so I see something about two guys getting in a fight and one guy shooting the other because of this game. Come on, man! Think about this… those teams you love so much aren’t going to do anything that stupid for you, so you shouldn’t do it for them. So enjoy the game, yell and all that… but don’t kill anyone. It really isn’t worth it.

As for the game, I have NO IDEA what to expect.


The I’m just sayin… Kid Show of the Week

Our Kid Show of the Week this week is the Challenge of the GoBots. Challenge of the GoBots is a cartoon series produced by Hanna-Barbera, based on the Gobots toy-line released from Tonka. Most of the toys were imported from the Japanese Machine Robo toy line. The show originally debuted in animated form as a five-part miniseries, which aired in syndication from October 29 - November 2, 1984. A regular series followed the next year, premiering on September 16, 1985. The series was later rerun on the USA Cartoon Express. Although initially a separate and competing franchise, Tonka's Gobots became the intellectual property of Hasbro after their buyout of Tonka in 1991. Subsequently, the universe depicted in the animated series Challenge of the GoBots and follow-up film GoBots: Battle of the Rock Lords was established as an alternate universe in the Transformers franchise.

GoBots dealt with two opposing forces of transforming robots from the planet GoBotron: the heroic Guardians and the evil Renegades. The Guardians were led by Leader-1 with others including Turbo and Scooter. The Renegades were led by Cy-Kill, with Crasher and Cop-Tur among their ranks. The characters rarely had guns, instead shooting energy blasts out of their fists. The female robots on the series were built like the males (only Crasher receiving any distinguishable female features). The GoBots' origin as organic beings accounted for the presence of genders among the robots.

The series generally focused on the "lead" three robots from each faction (Leader-1, Turbo and Scooter vs. Cy-Kill, Cop-Tur and Crasher), who were virtually ever-present, with other characters seeming to rotate in "guest-star" roles. GoBots had no clear divide between the two factions. The characters (as well as the toys) had no identifying insignias or markings to indicate their allegiance, although it was clearly indicated on the packaging. Likewise, there was no commonality of design within each faction. The only 'theme' to a side was that anything that turned into a 'monstrous'-looking robot or vehicle was a Renegade. Clips from the show were used in Errol Morris's Fast, Cheap and Out of Control.

In the series' backstory, set thousands of years ago on the planet GoBotron, there lived a race of human-like beings known as GoBings. Civil war erupted on the planet when the power-hungry terrorist group known as the Renegades arose, led by a madman dubbed the "Master Renegade", who waged war against the peaceful Guardians. When a Renegade sabotage operation inadvertently resulted in a gigantic asteroid colliding with GoBotron, the natural disasters that resulted from the asteroid's impact pushed the GoBings to the verge of extinction. However, the genius who became known as the "Last Engineer" saved his people, taking his experiments to replace parts of his own body with mechanical substitutes to the ultimate extent and transferring the GoBings brains into large robot bodies known as "GoBots". The GoBot forms possessed an additional ability; after being run through the device named the Modifier, the GoBots' bodies were able to transform into other vehicles. His work done, the Last Engineer intended to retreat to a pre-prepared workshop elsewhere in the galaxy, but the Master Renegade stole his ship and escaped in his stead. The Last Engineer placed himself into suspended animation beneath the surface of GoBotron, while above, the war continued to rage between the Guardians and the Renegades, now all encased in GoBot shells.

In the last quarter of the 20th Century, the planet Earth became involved in the conflict between Leader-1's Guardians and Cy-Kill's Renegades. During one of these battles, one of Leader-1's lieutenants, Turbo, became severely damaged. Unwilling to let his friend and teammate die, Leader-1 began his quest to find the legendary Last Engineer. Leader-1 found the person he believed to be the Last Engineer, but Leader-1 had unwittingly released the Master Renegade (though he did repair Turbo to gain the Guardians' trust). The Guardians later found the true Last Engineer, who was instrumental in frustrating the alliance between Cy-Kill's Renegades and the Master Renegade. The Master Renegade later escaped the custody of the Renegades, and plagued both factions, notably attacking the UniCom colony of New Earth.

I admit I haven’t seen this show in a long time, but from what I remember… it’s a great show to watch with your children.


Thanks for the info Wikipedia!

Friday, November 23, 2012

Know Your South Carolina Athlete

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Sergeant Bernhard Jetter (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions in December 1890, during the Sioux campaign. His citation reads:

Distinguished bravery.

First Lieutenant Erastus W. Jewett (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on February 2, 1864, at Newport Barracks, North Carolina. His citation reads:

By long and persistent resistance and burning the bridges kept a superior force of the enemy at a distance and thus covered the retreat of the garrison.

Sergeant Jim (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions during the Winter of 1871-1873. His citation reads:

Gallant conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches.


Our thoughts and prayers go out to all of the retail workers today. I know it’s good when business is good… but these can still be wild and crazy days with customers yelling and screaming like little children if something doesn’t go their way. And by the way, as someone who has lived through working retail (especially retail in a mall), I can assure you the customer isn’t “always right”. Truth is, the customer is seldom right… and they love to yell at the one person who has no control over the situation. So here’s to all of you in the retail world who are now faced with 12 hour shifts and ridiculously stupid store hours and insanely crowded parking lots. All I can say is I feel your pain… and you should get a state job so you won’t have to miss time with family over the holiday season.


The I’m just sayin… Know Your South Carolina Athlete

The South Carolina Athlete you should know this week is Summerville native A. J. Green. Adriel Jeremiah "A. J." Green (born July 31, 1988) is a wide receiver for the Cincinnati Bengals. He was selected fourth overall by the Bengals in the 2011 NFL Draft. Green played college football at the University of Georgia. In his first season with the Bengals, Green made the 2012 Pro Bowl and became the first rookie receiver to make it since Anquan Boldin in 2003, with the Arizona Cardinals. The last Bengal rookie wide receiver to make the Pro Bowl was Cris Collinsworth in 1981.

A. J. attended Summerville High School in Summerville, South Carolina, where he played under Coach John McKissick. He was widely considered to be one of the top football prospects of the 2008 high school class. He earned All-State honors four times and was named by EA Sports the nation's top sophomore player after catching 75 passes for 1,422 yards and 16 touchdowns in the 2006 season. He hauled in 57 passes for 1,217 yards and eight touchdowns as a freshman. In his junior season, Green caught 60 passes for 1,203 yards and 14 touchdowns. Green was the only junior nominated to the 2006 USA Today All-American first team. He was also a member of the Rivals.com Junior All-America team. A. J. Green's 5,373 career receiving yards rank second and his 279 career receptions rank fourth on the National Federation of High Schools’ football all-time career receiving records.

In June 2006, Green was profiled by Sports Illustrated as part of its “Where Will They Be?” stories on potential future professional greats, alongside Peter Uihlein, John Tavares, Tyreke Evans, Elena Delle Donne, and others. Sports Illustrated compared him to the then-Oakland Raiders wideout Randy Moss and predicted Green will be in the NFL by 2011. Rivals.com ranked Green their No. 9 prospect for the high school class of 2008, while Scout.com named Green their No. 10 prospect nationally. He participated in the Under Armour All-America Game.

Green was also on the Summerville High basketball team that claimed the 2007–2008 South Carolina state championship in a championship game against Spartanburg (S.C.) High. (Spartanburg made a 3/4 court shot at the end of the game, but the shot was disallowed by the referees after discussion). They had played in the memory of their fallen assistant coach, Captain Louis Mulkey (Engine 15) of the Charleston, SC F.D., who died along with eight other firefighters in the June 18, 2007, Charleston Sofa Super Store fire. The story of the Summerville High team was featured on SportsCenter.

In the fourth game of his college career, against Arizona State, Green had 8 catches for 159 yards and a touchdown. For this, he was named SEC Player of the Week. He finished the 2008 season with 56 catches for 963 yards and 8 touchdowns, all Georgia freshman school records. He also led the SEC in receiving yards, with the third-highest total in UGA school history. He was named second-team All-SEC and Freshman of the Year by the SEC coaches, and was named to the Associated Press All-SEC first team. He was not named to any national All-American teams. Green ended the 2009 regular season with 47 catches for 751 yards and 6 touchdowns, despite being injured the last three games of the season. Green returned from injury for the 2009 Independence Bowl, December 28, 2009 in Shreveport, LA where he made 6 catches totaling 57 yards. A. J. was suspended for the first four games of the 2010 regular season after he admitted to selling his 2009 Independence Bowl Jersey for $1,000 to former North Carolina defensive back Chris Hawkins, who the NCAA described as an agent or someone who markets amateur athletes. As part of his punishment, Green was required to repay $1,000 to a charity. Despite missing the first four games, Green finished the season with a team high 57 catches for 848 yards and nine touchdowns. He finished his three seasons at Georgia with 166 receptions for 2,619 yards and 23 touchdowns.

By the end of his rookie season, Green recorded four 100-yard games and led all NFL rookies in receptions and receiving yards, catching 65 passes for 1,057 yards in 15 games. His seven touchdown receptions was second among rookies – one behind Julio Jones. On December 18, 2011, Green and fellow rookie QB Andy Dalton surpassed the all-time NFL record for yards and receptions by a rookie QB/WR tandem. One week later on December 24, 2011, Green's 1,031 yards surpassed Cris Collinsworth's franchise record of 1,009 yards set in 1981 for most receiving yards by a rookie. Collinsworth still holds the franchise record for most receptions by a rookie with 67.

Congrats to A. J. Green for being our SC Athlete you should know this week.


Thanks for the info Wikipedia!

Thursday, November 22, 2012

Happy Thanksgiving!!!!!!

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Private James T. Jennings (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 20, 1864, at Weldon Railroad, Virginia. His citation reads:

Capture of flag of 55th North Carolina Infantry (C.S.A.).

Private Gotfred Jensen (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 13, 1899, at San Miguel de Mayumo, Luzon, Philippine Islands. His citation reads:

With 11 other scouts, without waiting for the supporting battalion to aid them or to get into a position to do so, charged over a distance of about 150 yards and completely routed about 300 of the enemy, who were in line and in a position that could only be carried by a frontal attack.

Major John L. Jerstad (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 1, 1943, at Ploesti Raid, Rumania. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty. On 1 August 1943, he served as pilot of the lead aircraft in his group in a daring low-level attack against enemy oil refineries and installations at Ploesti, Rumania. Although he had completed more than his share of missions and was no longer connected with this group, so high was his conception of duty that he volunteered to lead the formation in the correct belief that his participation would contribute materially to success in this attack. Maj. Jerstad led the formation into attack with full realization of the extreme hazards involved and despite withering fire from heavy and light antiaircraft guns. Three miles from the target his airplane was hit, badly damaged, and set on fire. Ignoring the fact that he was flying over a field suitable for a forced landing, he kept on the course. After the bombs of his aircraft were released on the target, the fire in his ship became so intense as to make further progress impossible and he crashed into the target area. By his voluntary acceptance of a mission he knew was extremely hazardous, and his assumption of an intrepid course of action at the risk of life over and above the call of duty, Maj. Jerstad set an example of heroism which will be an inspiration to the U.S. Armed Forces.


Thankful Thursday

Today, on the most thankful of all Thankful Thursdays, I am thankful for my family and friends… those who are still here and those who have passed. Great friends and family help get me through the hard times and make the good times that much better.

I am also thankful for sports. For me, sports are the great escape from reality. It doesn’t matter what is going on in the world, once I sit down to watch a game all my cares seem to go away.

And I can’t forget technology. I am very happy for technology… not just because without it I wouldn’t have this blog, but because it also allows me to watch old college football and basketball games. I even have our State Championship game from my junior year at JI on DVD. For Christmas, I might give Sonny DVDs of his high school State Championship games… Haha… Get it? Sonny didn’t play for a State Championship in high school. Really, it’s not as funny if I have to explain it to you… so try to keep up. One other great thing about technology is that it allows me to share the below clip with you. This is probably the greatest Thanksgiving TV moment in the history of this great country. Enjoy…


Wednesday, November 21, 2012

HAPPY BIRTHDAY J. MICHAEL GEOFFRY!!!!!!

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Private First Class Robert H. Jenkins, Jr. (US Marine Corps) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on March 5, 1969, at Fire Support Base Argonne, Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a machine gunner with Company C, 3d Reconnaissance Battalion, in connection with operations against enemy forces. Early in the morning Pfc. Jenkins' 12-man reconnaissance team was occupying a defensive position at Fire Support Base Argonne south of the Demilitarized Zone. Suddenly, the marines were assaulted by a North Vietnamese Army platoon employing mortars, automatic weapons, and hand grenades. Reacting instantly, Pfc. Jenkins and another marine quickly moved into a 2-man fighting emplacement, and as they boldly delivered accurate machine gun fire against the enemy, a North Vietnamese soldier threw a hand grenade into the friendly emplacement. Fully realizing the inevitable results of his actions, Pfc. Jenkins quickly seized his comrade, and pushing the man to the ground, he leaped on top of the marine to shield him from the explosion. Absorbing the full impact of the detonation, Pfc. Jenkins was seriously injured and subsequently succumbed to his wounds. His courage, inspiring valor and selfless devotion to duty saved a fellow marine from serious injury or possible death and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

Seaman Thomas Jenkins (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 27, 1863, on board the USS Cincinnati. His citation reads:

Served on board the U.S.S. Cincinnati during the attack on the Vicksburg batteries and at the time of her sinking, 27 May 1863. Engaging the enemy in a fierce battle, the Cincinnati, amidst an incessant fire of shot and shell, continued to fire her guns to the last, though so penetrated by shell fire that her fate was sealed. Serving bravely during this action, Jenkins was conspicuously cool under the fire of the enemy, never ceasing to fight until this proud ship went down, "her colors nailed to the mast."

Staff Sergeant Delbert O. Jennings (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on December 27, 1966, at Kim Song Valley, Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. Part of Company C was defending an artillery position when attacked by a North Vietnamese Army regiment supported by mortar, recoilless-rifle, and machine gun fire. At the outset, S/Sgt. Jennings sprang to his bunker, astride the main attack route, and slowed the on-coming enemy wave with highly effective machine gun fire. Despite a tenacious defense in which he killed at least 12 of the enemy, his squad was forced to the rear. After covering the withdrawal of the squad, he rejoined his men, destroyed an enemy demolition crew about to blow up a nearby howitzer, and killed 3 enemy soldiers at his initial bunker position. Ordering his men back into a secondary position, he again covered their withdrawal, killing 1 enemy with the butt of his weapon. Observing that some of the defenders were unaware of an enemy force in their rear, he raced through a fire-swept area to warn the men, turn their fire on the enemy, and lead them into the secondary perimeter. Assisting in the defense of the new position, he aided the air-landing of reinforcements by throwing white phosphorous grenades on the landing zone despite dangerously silhouetting himself with the light. After helping to repulse the final enemy assaults, he led a group of volunteers well beyond friendly lines to an area where 8 seriously wounded men lay. Braving enemy sniper fire and ignoring the presence of booby traps in the area, they recovered the 8 men who would have probably perished without early medical treatment. S/Sgt. Jenning's extraordinary heroism and inspirational leadership saved the lives of many of his comrades and contributed greatly to the defeat of a superior enemy force. His actions stand with the highest traditions of the military profession and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.


We would like to take a second here to wish my good friend and banker J. Michael Geoff a very HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!!! We hope Adrian and the boys make it a great one. (fyi... I picked out the Quote of the Week with J. Michael Geoff in mind).

We'd also like to say RIP to one of my Kappa Sigma brothers, Kelvin Redmond.  He wasn't at Winthrop when I joined the fraternity, but I did have a chance to meet and talk to him over the years.  I found him to be a good guy.  I know a lot of people who did know him well and I think they would agree with me.  The Winthrop chapter of Kappa Sigma (Nu-Upsilon) was founded on May 8, 1993.  We are coming up on our 20th anniversary... I believe Kelvin is the 3rd brother from our chapter to die.  He was older than me, but still far too young to die.  Matt Kelleher was the second brother to die a little over 5 years ago back in September of 2007.  The first was Brian Black, who died 10 years ago today.  Brian's Little Brother in Kappa Sigma was my Big Brother.  As I was telling Jeremy yesterday, I KNOW it's been 10 years since Brian died, but it just doesn't FEEL like it's been that long.  I can only hope those 3 died knowing how much they'd be missed.  RIP Brothers.


The picture quality isn't great, but I think this was taken outside at night before/during a party with a camera that wasn't great... so sue me.  Anyway, from L - R we have the late Brian Black, his little (my big) brother Jason Wheatley and me (with hair)



Now... Let's look at the quote that made me think of J. Michael Geoff...


The I’m just sayin… Quote of the Week

Behind every successful man stands a surprised mother-in-law. - Hubert H. Humphrey

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Pictures

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Sergeant William R. Jecelin (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 19, 1950, near Saga, Korea. His citation reads:

Sgt. Jecelin, Company C, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and Intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. His company was ordered to secure a prominent, sawtoothed ridge from a well-entrenched and heavily armed enemy. Unable to capture the objective in the first attempt, a frontal and flanking assault was launched. He led his platoon through heavy enemy fire and bursting shells, across ricefields and rocky terrain, in direct frontal attack on the ridge in order to draw fire away from the flanks. The unit advanced to the base of the cliff, where intense, accurate hostile fire stopped the attack. Realizing that an assault was the only solution, Sgt. Jecelin rose from his position firing his rifle and throwing grenades as he called on his men to follow him. Despite the intense enemy fire this attack carried to the crest of the ridge where the men were forced to take cover. Again he rallied his men and stormed the enemy strongpoint. With fixed bayonets they charged into the face of antitank fire and engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. After clubbing and slashing this force into submission the platoon was forced to take cover from direct frontal fire of a self-propelled gun. Refusing to be stopped he leaped to his feet and through sheer personal courage and fierce determination led his men in a new attack. At this instant a well-camouflaged enemy soldier threw a grenade at the remaining members of the platoon. He immediately lunged and covered the grenade with his body, absorbing the full force of the explosion to save those around him. This incredible courage and willingness to sacrifice himself for his comrades so imbued them with fury that they completely eliminated the enemy force. Sgt. Jecelin's heroic leadership and outstanding gallantry reflect the highest credit upon himself and uphold the esteemed traditions of the military service.

Sergeant Benjamin H. Jellison (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. His citation reads:

Capture of flag of 57th Virginia Infantry (C.S.A.). He also assisted in taking prisoners.

Private First Class Don J. Jenkins (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on January 6, 1969, at Kien Phong Province, Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. S/Sgt. Jenkins (then Pfc.), Company A, distinguished himself while serving as a machine gunner on a reconnaissance mission. When his company came under heavy crossfire from an enemy complex, S/Sgt. Jenkins unhesitatingly maneuvered forward to a perilously exposed position and began placing suppressive fire on the enemy. When his own machine gun jammed, he immediately obtained a rifle and continued to fire into the enemy bunkers until his machine gun was made operative by his assistant. He exposed himself to extremely heavy fire when he repeatedly both ran and crawled across open terrain to obtain resupplies of ammunition until he had exhausted all that was available for his machine gun. Displaying tremendous presence of mind, he then armed himself with 2 antitank weapons and, by himself, maneuvered through the hostile fusillade to within 20 meters of an enemy bunker to destroy that position. After moving back to the friendly defensive perimeter long enough to secure yet another weapon, a grenade launcher, S/Sgt. Jenkins moved forward to a position providing no protection and resumed placing accurate fire on the enemy until his ammunition was again exhausted. During this time he was seriously wounded by shrapnel. Undaunted and displaying great courage, he moved forward 100 meters to aid a friendly element that was pinned down only a few meters from the enemy. This he did with complete disregard for his own wound and despite having been advised that several previous rescue attempts had failed at the cost of the life of 1 and the wounding of others. Ignoring the continuing intense fire and his painful wounds, and hindered by darkness, he made 3 trips to the beleaguered unit, each time pulling a wounded comrade back to safety. S/Sgt. Jenkins' extraordinary valor, dedication, and indomitable spirit inspired his fellow soldiers to repulse the determined enemy attack and ultimately to defeat the larger force. S/Sgt. Jenkins risk of his life reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.


Picture Tuesday
Susie "reading" her Bible to Daniel


Daniel and Susie fighting over Susie's Bible

The rest of the pictures today were taken by Susie when she took my phone away from me and walked around the house.  First, we have a picture of Maverick (or, The Black One as Susie calls him).

Here we see Scooby (or, The Brown One as Susie calls him) in the middle of shaking

A Susie-view of our table


Some pictures of "her" children


She told me to say "Cheese" so she could take a picture of me... this is how it looked.  I'm thinking maybe my Aunt Yvonne gave her lessons on how to take a picture.  Ha!

Monday, November 19, 2012

Weigh-In

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Sergeant James Jardine (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Mississippi. His citation reads:

Gallantry in the charge of the "volunteer storming party."

Seaman Berrie H. Jarrett (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on April 21, 1914, on board the USS Florida. His citation reads:

On board the U.S.S. Florida Jarrett displayed extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession during the seizure of Vera Cruz, Mexico, 21 April 1914.

Sergeant Frederick Jarvis (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on October 20, 1869, at Chiricahua Mountains, Arizona. His citation reads:

Gallantry in action.


Congrats to both Clemson and USC for their wins this past Saturday. If I’m not mistaken, the win for Clemson gave them a share of the ACC Atlantic (though FSU will be going to the ACC Championship game since they own the tie-breaker over the Tigers). It’s good to see both teams heading into the game this Saturday with some momentum. Get all of your trash-talking in this week, because come Sunday half of you won’t be able to say anything.


The I’m just sayin… Weekly Weigh-In

Greg 237

Mary Ruth 50

Susie 30

Daniel 25

Sunday, November 18, 2012

Happy Short Work-Week Sunday!!

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Private First Class Willy F. James, Jr. (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on April 7, 1945, near Lippoldsberg, Germany. His citation reads:

For extraordinary heroism in action on 7 April 1945 near Lippoldsberg, Germany. As lead scout during a maneuver to secure and expand a vital bridgehead, Private First Class James was the first to draw enemy fire. He was pinned down for over an hour, during which time he observed enemy positions in detail. Returning to his platoon, he assisted in working out a new plan of maneuver. He then led a squad in the assault, accurately designating targets as he advanced, until he was killed by enemy machine gun fire while going to the aid of his fatally wounded platoon leader. Private First Class James' fearless, self-assigned actions, coupled with his diligent devotion to duty exemplified the finest traditions of the Armed Forces.

First Sergeant Walter Jamieson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on July 30, 1864, at Petersburg, Virginia AND on September 29, 1864, at Fort Harrison, Virginia. His citation reads:

Voluntarily went between the lines under a heavy fire at Petersburg, Va., to the assistance of a wounded and helpless officer, whom he carried within the Union lines. At Fort Harrison, Va., seized the regimental color, the color bearer and guard having been shot down, and, rushing forward, planted it upon the fort in full view of the entire brigade.

Fireman First Class Alexander Jardine (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on November 14, 1898, on board the USS Potomac. His citation reads:

On board the U.S.S. Potomac during the passage of that vessel from Cat Island to Nassau, 14 November 1898. Volunteering to enter the fireroom which was filled with steam, Jardine, after repeated attempts, succeeded in reaching the auxiliary valve and opening it, thereby relieving the vessel from further danger.


The I’m just sayin… Bible Verse of the Week
PHILEMON 1:6

I pray that your partnership with us in the faith may be effective in deepening your understanding of every good thing we share for the sake of Christ.

Saturday, November 17, 2012

Kid Show of the Week

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Captain of the Top John H. James (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 5, 1864, on board the USS Richmond. His citation reads:

As captain of a gun on board the U.S.S. Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, James fought his gun with skill and courage throughout a furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Corporal John James (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 9-11, 1874, at Upper Wichita, Texas. His citation reads:

Gallantry in action.

Corporal Miles James (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 30, 1864, at Chapins Farm, Virginia. His citation reads:

Having had his arm mutilated, making immediate amputation necessary, he loaded and discharged his piece with one hand and urged his men forward; this within 30 yards of the enemy's works.


Good luck today to Winthrop as they host VCU. I’ll be at the game with Jeremy trying to cheer the Eagles on to victory.

Good luck also to Clemson as they host NC State and to the Revolutionary War Heroes as they host Wofford. I had a chance to attend the USC game but won’t be able to since Danny (yes, that Danny) couldn’t get them to move the kickoff to 7:00. I am not mad at him since I am sure he at least sent a strongly worded email to the “powers that be” letting them know how unhappy he is they are playing the game at noon.


The I’m just sayin… Kid Show of the Week

Our Kid Show of the Week this week is He-Man and the Masters of the Universe. He-Man and the Masters of the Universe is a cartoon show produced by Filmation based on Mattel's successful toy line Masters of the Universe. The show, often referred to as simply He-Man, was one of the most popular animated children's shows of the 1980s, and has retained a heavy cult following to this day. The show made its television debut in 1983 and ran until 1985, consisting of two seasons of 65 episodes each. Reruns continued to air in syndication until 1988, at which point USA Network bought the rights to the series. USA aired He-Man until September 1990.

The show takes place on the fictional planet of Eternia, a planet of magic, myth and fantasy. The show's lead character is Prince Adam, the young son of Eternia's rulers, King Randor and Queen Marlena. Whenever Prince Adam uses the Power Sword, and when he holds it aloft and says the magic words "By the Power of Grayskull, I HAVE THE POWER" he is transformed into He-Man, the most powerful man in the universe. Together with his close allies, Battle Cat (who undergoes a similar transformation from being Adam's cowardly pet tiger Cringer), The Sorceress, Teela, Man-At-Arms and Orko, He-Man uses his powers to defend Eternia from the evil forces of Skeletor. Skeletor's main goal is to conquer the mysterious fortress of Castle Grayskull, from which He-Man draws his powers. If he succeeds, Skeletor would conquer the world of Eternia, and possibly the whole universe.

This is a GREAT show to watch with your children.


Thanks to Wikipedia for the info!

Friday, November 16, 2012

Know Your South Carolina Athlete

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Private First Class Douglas Thomas Jacobson (US Marine Corps) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on February 26, 1945, on Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 3d Battalion, 23d Marines, 4th Marine Division, in combat against enemy Japanese forces during the seizure of Iwo Jima in the Volcano Island, 26 February 1945. Promptly destroying a stubborn 20mm. antiaircraft gun and its crew after assuming the duties of a bazooka man who had been killed, Pfc. Jacobson waged a relentless battle as his unit fought desperately toward the summit of Hill 382 in an effort to penetrate the heart of Japanese cross-island defense. Employing his weapon with ready accuracy when his platoon was halted by overwhelming enemy fire on 26 February, he first destroyed 2 hostile machinegun positions, then attacked a large blockhouse, completely neutralizing the fortification before dispatching the 5-man crew of a second pillbox and exploding the installation with a terrific demolitions blast. Moving steadily forward, he wiped out an earth-covered rifle emplacement and, confronted by a cluster of similar emplacements which constituted the perimeter of enemy defenses in his assigned sector, fearlessly advanced, quickly reduced all 6 positions to a shambles, killed 10 of the enemy, and enabled our forces to occupy the strong point. Determined to widen the breach thus forced, he volunteered his services to an adjacent assault company, neutralized a pillbox holding up its advance, opened fire on a Japanese tank pouring a steady stream of bullets on 1 of our supporting tanks, and smashed the enemy tank's gun turret in a brief but furious action culminating in a single-handed assault against still another blockhouse and the subsequent neutralization of its firepower. By his dauntless skill and valor, Pfc. Jacobson destroyed a total of 16 enemy positions and annihilated approximately 75 Japanese, thereby contributing essentially to the success of his division's operations against this fanatically defended outpost of the Japanese Empire. His gallant conduct in the face of tremendous odds enhanced and sustained the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.

Sergeant Major Eugene P. Jacobson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 2, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia. His citation reads:

Bravery in conducting a scouting party in front of the enemy.

Private Isaac James (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on April 2, 1865, at Petersburg, Virginia. His citation reads:

Capture of flag.


The I’m just sayin… Know Your South Carolina Athlete

The South Carolina athlete we are going to look at this week is Lawrence Timmons. Lawrence Olajuwon Timmons was born on May 14, 1986 in Florence, South Carolina. Timmons played high school football at Wilson High School in Florence, South Carolina playing tight end and linebacker. During his senior year he was awarded as the Defensive Player of the Year and received Super Prep Elite 50 honors. He was also selected to play in the 2003 East-West Shrine Game. Timmons played college football at Florida State University. He chose Florida State over numerous colleges including Florida, Tennessee, North Carolina and Georgia. After being used mainly on special teams and as a backup linebacker for his first two years, he became a starter during his junior year after Ernie Sims was drafted in the 2006 NFL Draft. He had a great season recording 79 tackles and five sacks, and was honored with All-American third-team and All-Atlantic Coast Conference first-team. He finished his college career with 126 tackles and eight sacks.

He was drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers 15th overall in the 2007 NFL Draft. In his rookie season, he played in 16 games recording 13 tackles. Timmons' playing time increased during his second season in 2008. He finished the season with 65 tackles, five sacks and an interception. In Super Bowl XLIII he recorded 5 tackles in the 27-23 victory over the Arizona Cardinals. Timmons took over as starter for the 2009 season following the release of Larry Foote, who had wanted out due to Timmons's increasing playing time. Foote would return to the Steelers the following year to be Timmons' backup. In 2010, despite getting less acclaim than many on the Steelers defense, he led the team in tackles with 135, also recording 3 sacks, 2 forced fumbles and 2 interceptions.

Lawrence's mother, a huge basketball fan, named Timmons after NBA legend and Basketball Hall of Famer Hakeem Olajuwon by giving him the middle name Olajuwon.

Congrats to Lawrence Timmons for being the SC athlete you should know this week.


Thanks to Wikipedia for the info!

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Lovin' work...

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Captain James Jackson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 20, 1877, at Camas Meadows, Idaho. His citation reads:

Dismounted from his horse in the face of a heavy fire from pursuing Indians, and with the assistance of 1 or 2 of the men of his command secured to a place of safety the body of his trumpeter, who had been shot and

Lieutenant Colonel Joe M. Jackson (US Air Force) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 12, 1968, at Kham Duc, Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Lt. Col. Jackson distinguished himself as pilot of a C-123 aircraft. Lt. Col. Jackson volunteered to attempt the rescue of a 3-man USAF Combat Control Team from the special forces camp at Kham Duc. Hostile forces had overrun the forward outpost and established gun positions on the airstrip. They were raking the camp with small arms, mortars, light and heavy automatic weapons, and recoilless rifle fire. The camp was engulfed in flames and ammunition dumps were continuously exploding and littering the runway with debris. In addition, 8 aircraft had been destroyed by the intense enemy fire and 1 aircraft remained on the runway reducing its usable length to only 2,200 feet. To further complicate the landing, the weather was deteriorating rapidly, thereby permitting only 1 air strike prior to his landing. Although fully aware of the extreme danger and likely failure of such an attempt. Lt. Col. Jackson elected to land his aircraft and attempt to rescue. Displaying superb airmanship and extraordinary heroism, he landed his aircraft near the point where the combat control team was reported to be hiding. While on the ground, his aircraft was the target of intense hostile fire. A rocket landed in front of the nose of the aircraft but failed to explode. Once the combat control team was aboard, Lt. Col. Jackson succeeded in getting airborne despite the hostile fire directed across the runway in front of his aircraft. Lt. Col. Jackson's profound concern for his fellowmen, at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Air Force and reflect great credit upon himself, and the Armed Forces of his country.

1st Lieutenant Jack H. Jacobs (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on March 9, 1968, at Kien Phong Province, Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Capt. Jacobs (then 1st Lt.), Infantry, distinguished himself while serving as assistant battalion advisor, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. The 2d Battalion was advancing to contact when it came under intense heavy machine gun and mortar fire from a Viet Cong battalion positioned in well fortified bunkers. As the 2d Battalion deployed into attack formation its advance was halted by devastating fire. Capt. Jacobs, with the command element of the lead company, called for and directed air strikes on the enemy positions to facilitate a renewed attack. Due to the intensity of the enemy fire and heavy casualties to the command group, including the company commander, the attack stopped and the friendly troops became disorganized. Although wounded by mortar fragments, Capt. Jacobs assumed command of the allied company, ordered a withdrawal from the exposed position and established a defensive perimeter. Despite profuse bleeding from head wounds which impaired his vision, Capt. Jacobs, with complete disregard for his safety, returned under intense fire to evacuate a seriously wounded advisor to the safety of a wooded area where he administered lifesaving first aid. He then returned through heavy automatic weapons fire to evacuate the wounded company commander. Capt. Jacobs made repeated trips across the fire-swept open rice paddies evacuating wounded and their weapons. On 3 separate occasions, Capt. Jacobs contacted and drove off Viet Cong squads who were searching for allied wounded and weapons, single-handedly killing 3 and wounding several others. His gallant actions and extraordinary heroism saved the lives of 1 U.S. advisor and 13 allied soldiers. Through his effort the allied company was restored to an effective fighting unit and prevented defeat of the friendly forces by a strong and determined enemy. Capt. Jacobs, by his gallantry and bravery in action in the highest traditions of the military service, has reflected great credit upon himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.


Thankful Thursday

I feel like I am saying this a lot on here, but today I am thankful for my job. I’ve been in this position for almost a year and I still love it. There are some in my office who I am closer to than others, but none who I can’t stand. I like what I do and I feel like I’m pretty good at it. That can really make life easy (or at the very least, easier). It’s hard to say what the best part of my job is, but days like today really make it great. We are having our Thanksgiving meal today in our office. The last time I had a Thanksgiving meal at work was back when I was in college working at Rack Room Shoes in the Pineville mall. And that Thanksgiving meal was eaten the day after Thanksgiving in the back room of our store one person at a time while everyone else dealt with the madness that is known as Black Friday. We had the meal because our manager (the great Peggy) knew that there wasn’t going to be enough time for any of us to go out for our lunch (and supper) so she brought food in for us (may God always bless her for that). Today, though, I get (or got, not sure when you are reading this) a Thanksgiving meal at work that I can sit down and enjoy with people who I’ve become friends with over the past 11 months. And for that, I am thankful. Plus, these people really know how to eat. Man I love my job!

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Happy 20th to Sonny and Cougar!

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Staff Sergeant Isadore S. Jachman (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on January 4, 1945, at Flamierge, Belgium. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty at Flamierge, Belgium, on 4 January 1945, when his company was pinned down by enemy artillery, mortar, and small arms fire, 2 hostile tanks attacked the unit, inflicting heavy. casualties. S/Sgt. Jachman, seeing the desperate plight of his comrades, left his place of cover and with total disregard for his own safety dashed across open ground through a hail of fire and seizing a bazooka from a fallen comrade advanced on the tanks, which concentrated their fire on him. Firing the weapon alone, he damaged one and forced both to retire. S/Sgt. Jachman's heroic action, in which he suffered fatal wounds, disrupted the entire enemy attack, reflecting the highest credit upon himself and the parachute infantry.

Private First Class Arthur J. Jackson (US Marine Corps) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 18, 1944, on the Island of Peleliu in the Palau group. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 3d Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces on the Island of Peleliu in the Palau group, 18 September 1944. Boldly taking the initiative when his platoon's left flank advance was held up by the fire of Japanese troops concealed in strongly fortified positions, Pfc. Jackson unhesitatingly proceeded forward of our lines and, courageously defying the heavy barrages, charged a large pillbox housing approximately 35 enemy soldiers. Pouring his automatic fire into the opening of the fixed installation to trap the occupying troops, he hurled white phosphorus grenades and explosive charges brought up by a fellow marine, demolishing the pillbox and killing all of the enemy. Advancing alone under the continuous fire from other hostile emplacements, he employed similar means to smash 2 smaller positions in the immediate vicinity. Determined to crush the entire pocket of resistance although harassed on all sides by the shattering blasts of Japanese weapons and covered only by small rifle parties, he stormed 1 gun position after another, dealing death and destruction to the savagely fighting enemy in his inexorable drive against the remaining defenses, and succeeded in wiping out a total of 12 pillboxes and 50 Japanese soldiers. Stouthearted and indomitable despite the terrific odds. Pfc. Jackson resolutely maintained control of the platoon's left flank movement throughout his valiant 1-man assault and, by his cool decision and relentless fighting spirit during a critical situation, contributed essentially to the complete annihilation of the enemy in the southern sector of the island. His gallant initiative and heroic conduct in the face of extreme peril reflect the highest credit upon Pfc. Jackson and the U.S. Naval Service.

First Sergeant Frederick R. Jackson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on June 16, 1862, on James Island, South Carolina. His citation reads:

Having his left arm shot away in a charge on the enemy, he continued on duty, taking part in a second and a third charge until he fell exhausted from the loss of blood.


I'd like to start today by wishing Sonny and Cougar a happy 20th Anniversary!  Or, as Sonny would call it... just another day.  That Sonny, such a romantic. 

I feel like we should be able to vote on which movies can be remade and which movies can't.  In general, I don't think any movies should be remade... I think it's cheap.  Come up with an original idea... or at least an orginial title.  I bring this up, of course, because I've been seeing commercials for Red Dawn.  I'm sorry, Red Dawn has already been made... and it was perfect the first time.  Now, if you want to make a Red Dawn II, fine.  It would probably suck and I doubt I'd watch it... but at least it would be it's own movie and not a remake of a classic.  I did see some of a remake of Steel Magnolias a few weeks ago with an all black starring cast.  It was... interesting.  For one thing, it was done for TV... so I'm not really sure that counts.  The remake had a pretty good cast and for the most part it seemed to "work"... except for the fact that as hard as I tried, I just couldn't stop seeing it as so-and-so playing someone elses role.  For example, I kept seeing Phylicia Rashad playing Olympia Dukakis when I should have seen her as Clairee.  While I should have been watching the movie, I found myself just comparing the new cast to the original cast.  For about the 10 minutes I watched, I thought the new cast held their own (they are, after all, pretty dang good actresses in their own right).  The one thing that made me turn it (other than realizing I had been watching Lifetime for about 10 minutes) was watching Alfre Woodard play Ouiser.  Don't get me wrong, I've seen Alfre Woodard in various things and think she is a fine actress... but she doesn't come close to Shirley MacLaine.  To be fair, I don't know of anyone who could come close to Shirley MacLaine.  You'll remember that in our eyes when it comes to the greatest actresses of all time we've got Shirley MacLaine and that's it... that's the list.  Anyway, the bottom line is we at I'm just sayin... feel great movies shouldn't be remade. 


The I’m just sayin… Quote of the Week

The time to make friends is before you need them. - Coach John Wooden

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Picture Time

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Unidentified Italian Soldier received his Medal of Honor for his actions in World War I. His citation reads:

* * * By virtue of a joint resolution of Congress, approved 12 October 1921, the Medal of Honor, emblem of highest ideals and virtues, is bestowed in the name of the Congress of the United States upon the unknown, unidentified Italian soldier to be buried in the National Monument to Victor Emanuel 11, in Rome. Whereas the Congress has authorized the bestowal of the Congressional Medal of Honor upon unknown, unidentified British and French soldiers buried in Westminster Abbey, London, England, and the Arc de Triomphe, Paris, France, respectively, who fought beside our soldiers in the recent war, and Whereas, animated by the same spirit of friendship toward the soldiers of Italy who also fought as comrades of the American soldiers during the World War, we desire to add whatever we can to the imperishable glory won by their deeds and to participate in paying tribute to their unknown dead: Now, therefore. be it resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the President of the United States be, and he is hereby, authorized to bestow, with appropriate ceremonies, military and civil, the Congressional Medal of Honor upon the unknown, unidentified Italian soldier to be buried in the National Monument to Victor Emanuel 11, in Rome, Italy (A.G. 220.523) (War Department General Orders, No. 52, I Dec. 1922, Sec. II).

Chief Carpenter’s Mate Franz Anton Itrich (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 1, 1898, on board the USS Petrel. His citation reads:

On board the U.S.S. Petrel, Manila, Philippine Islands, 1 May 1898. Serving in the presence of the enemy, Itrich displayed heroism during the action.

Lieutenant Edouard Victor Michel Izac (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 21, 1918, aboard German submarine U-90 as preisoner of war. His citation reads:

When the U.S.S. President Lincoln was attacked and sunk by the German submarine U-90, on 21 May 1918, Lt. Izac was captured and held as a prisoner on board the U-90 until the return of the submarine to Germany, when he was confined in the prison camp. During his stay on the U-90 he obtained information of the movements of German submarines which was so important that he determined to escape, with a view to making this information available to the U.S. and Allied Naval authorities. In attempting to carry out this plan, he jumped through the window of a rapidly moving train at the imminent risk of death, not only from the nature of the act itself but from the fire of the armed German soldiers who were guarding him. Having been recaptured and reconfined, Lt. Izac made a second and successful attempt to escape, breaking his way through barbed-wire fences and deliberately drawing the fire of the armed guards in the hope of permitting others to escape during the confusion. He made his way through the mountains of southwestern Germany, having only raw vegetables for food, and at the end, swam the River Rhine during the night in the immediate vicinity of German sentries.


For any of you trying to plan for the Thanksgiving weekend, the Clemson/USC (or USC/Clemson, if you will) game will be at 7:00 on either ESPN or ESPN2.  I will probably prepare for this game the same way I am preparing for the Clemson/NC State game... watch DVDs of past games between the two teams that are so old they'll have nothing at all to do with current teams.


Picture Tuesday
 
A new sign on the wall in Winthrop Coliseum.  The person on the sign is former Winthrop great De'Andre Adams.

This is the sign behind our seats... The person on this sign is another former Winthrop great Michael Jenkins.  Little know fact (unless I already told you) - Jeremy and I used to sit by/near MJ's mom his last two seasons. 

Ross and me at our his and Yoko's Ginny's Reception. The hand holding was all his idea.  I mean, I didn't fight it... but it was his idea.

Another pic from the Reception... I think we were making a heart with our hands but I can't be too sure.  Honesly, I'd had enough to drink that I felt like I should send Ginny's dad a "Thank You" card.  I didn't send him one, but I felt like I should.

Susie was sick, so The Wife kept her home.  All Susie did was sleep.  She was so sick, I was told that I had to keep her home the next day (and take her to the doctor).

"Sick" Susie at the doctor's office the next day.

She talked... THE WHOLE DAY!  I mean... non-stop.

Our wedding gift to Ginny and Ross.  It was The Wife's idea.  I'm thinking of using it for all future weddings.  I mean, who wouldn't want a big blanket that has a picture of me and Ross on one side of it?