Disclaimer

If you do not know me (I mean, really know me) then there is something you need to understand before you read this blog: I value the truth above everything else... except a good laugh. A good laugh will almost always beat the truth as far as I’m concerned. Everything you read on this blog will be true, somewhat true, or something I made up in an effort to get a laugh. Sometimes I will go on a rant that I don’t really mean (or only kind of mean). Sometimes I will mean what I write only to completely change my mind a year, month, or day later. Such is life. By reading this blog you agree not to get offended by anything I write (or, at the very least, you agree not to tell me or anyone else that you are offended). It is worth noting that my employer does not endorse my blog (or even read it, to tell you the truth). The Wife also does not endorse my blog (though she will read it from time to time). I am not paid to write this... it’s just my way of giving back to the community. I have, and will, touch on a wide range of subjects and will give my opinion on these subjects. Again, most of what I say is for laughs but every now and then I will say what I really think and feel (see my views on Westboro Baptist Cult). How will you know when I’m serious and when I’m trying to get a laugh? You’ll know. And if you don’t know, well... maybe this isn’t the best thing for you to be reading. So, sit back, read and enjoy. Leave comments if you want and don’t be afraid to publicly follow me.



Sunday, July 31, 2016

HAPPY BIRTHDAY JENN!!!!!!!!!!!

Join Team I’m just sayin… in our Walk to End Alzheimer’s! If you would like to join or donate, just click on the Walk to End Alzheimer’s button above this post (if you are on your computer). Or, if you’re on your phone click here.


Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Sergeant Gordon Douglas Yntema (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on January 16-18, 1968, near Thong Binh, Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life and above and beyond the call of duty. Sgt. Yntema, U.S. Army, distinguished himself on 16-18 January 1968, while advising civilian irregulars from Camp Cai Cai. Sergeant Yntema accompanied two platoons to a blocking position east of the Village of Thong Binh. They became heavily engaged in a fire fight with the Viet Cong. Assuming control of the force when the Vietnamese commander was seriously wounded, Sergeant Yntema advanced his troops to within 50 meters of the enemy bunkers. After a fierce fire fight, Sergeant Yntema withdrew his men to a trench which offered them protection while still allowing them to perform their blocking mission. Under the cover of machine gun fire, a company of Viet Cong maneuvered into a position effectively surrounding Yntema's platoons on three sides. A dwindling ammunition supply, coupled with a Viet Cong mortar barrage which inflicted heavy losses on the exposed position, prompted many of the South Vietnamese troops to withdraw. Seriously wounded and ordered to withdraw himself, Sergeant Yntema refused to leave his fallen comrades. Under withering small arms and machine gun fire, he carried the wounded Vietnamese commander and a mortally wounded American Special Forces advisor to a small gully 50 meters away to shield them from the enemy fire. Sergeant Yntema continued to repulse the attacking Viet Cong during their attempts to overrun his position until, out of ammunition and surrounded, he was offered the opportunity to surrender. Refusing, Sergeant Yntema stood his ground, using his rifle as a club to fight the approximately fifteen Viet Cong attempting his capture. His resistance was so fierce that the Viet Cong were forced to shoot him in order to overcome him.

Corporal Alvin C. York (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on October 8, 1918, near Chatel-Chehery, France. His citation reads:

After his platoon had suffered heavy casualties and 3 other noncommissioned officers had become casualties, Cpl. York assumed command. Fearlessly leading 7 men, he charged with great daring a machinegun nest which was pouring deadly and incessant fire upon his platoon. In this heroic feat the machinegun nest was taken, together with 4 officers and 128 men and several guns.

Sergeant Andrew J. Young (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on April 5, 1865, at Paines Crossroads, Virginia. His citation reads:

Capture of flag.


Today’s Pic

I know I said Maverick was the greatest... but these two (Maverick and Lucy) aren't far behind.  

I'd like to wish my good friend Jenn a VERY HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! As you know, Jenn is the reason I am the world class blogger that I am today.  If she hadn't started a blog, promised to post twice a week and then not post anything for weeks (months? years?) at a time, I would never have started this blog (to prove to her that blogging isn't really all that hard). Anyway... HAPPY BIRTHDAY JENN!!!!!!!!!!!!! I hope you have a GREAT day!!!!!!

Saturday, July 30, 2016

OUR TEAM IS GROWING!!!!!!!!!

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Boatswain’s Mate John Woon (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on April 29, 1863, on board the U.S.S. Pittsburg. His citation reads:

Serving on board the U.S.S. Pittsburg, Mississippi River, 29 April 1863. Engaging the enemy batteries at Grand Gulf, the U.S.S. Pittsburg, although severely damaged and suffering many personnel casualties, continued to fire her batteries until ordered to withdraw. Taking part in a similar action after nightfall, the U.S.S. Pittsburg received further damage, but receiving no personnel casualities in the latter action. Woon showed courage and devotion to duty throughout these bitter engagements.

Seaman Charles B. Woram (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 5, 1864, on board the U.S.S. Oneida. His citation reads:

Served on board the U.S.S. Oneida in the engagement at Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Acting as an aid to the executive officer, Woram carried orders intelligently and correctly, distinguishing himself by his cool courage throughout the battle which resulted in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee and the damaging of Fort Morgan.

Unknown Soldier of World War I (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions in World War I. His citation reads:

* * * By virtue of an act of Congress approved 24 August 1921, the Medal of Honor, emblem of highest ideals and virtues is bestowed in the name of the Congress of the United States upon the unknown American, typifying the gallantry and intrepidity, at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty, of our beloved heroes who made the supreme sacrifice in the World War. They died in order that others might live (293.8, A.G:O.) (War Department General Orders, No. 59, 13 Dec. 1921, sec. I).


Today’s Pic

Dach, Lucy, Maverick and Scooby.. all great dogs, but the greatest of these was Dach.  He could play ball like a champ.  He listened like it was all he ever wanted to do and he loved having his picture taken.  He was also good at taking naps. Really, he was the best at all of these things...

First off, a big "Thank You" to everyone who has already donated.  This is the most money I've ever raised for this even before August.  If you've donated, remember to tell a friend.  Give them a chance to join this rocket ship called I'm just sayin....  Second off, THANKS to Teresa Lynn and Leah for joining Team I'm just sayin...!  Teresa Lynn already made a big splash raising over $200 within less than an hour of posting something on Facebook.  Some of you may have noticed my personal goal (as well as the team goal) have both gone up.  That's because in less than a month, we blew past the previous goals.  And should we reach these new goals (as I hope we will), I will raise them again to higher levels.  They like for you to set these goals, but really my goal has always been "more".  If, God willing, we were to raise $5,000, I would immediately raise the goal to $5,500.  Goals are nice, but I fear some people will look at them as limits.  They will look and think, "Oh, they reached their goal so I don't need to give".  NO!  Like Harvard University's Endowment, Team I'm just sayin... will never raise "enough" money for our Walk to End Alzheimer's.

Friday, July 29, 2016

Big Tommy

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Private Daniel A. Woods (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on April 6, 1865, at Sailors Creek, Virginia. His citation reads:

Capture of flag of 18th Florida Infantry (C.S.A.).

Seaman Samuel Woods (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on April 14, 1863, on board the U.S.S. Mount Washington. His citation reads:

As captain of the gun, serving temporarily on board the U.S.S. Mount Washington, during the Nansemond River action, 14 April 1863. When one of his comrades was struck by a bullet and knocked overboard, Woods fearlessly jumped into the water and swam after him. Before he reached him, the man sank beneath the surface and Woods promptly swam back to the vessel, went to his gun, and fought it to the close of the action. At the close of the battle, he tirelessly cared for the wounded.

First Lieutenant/Adjutant Evan M. Woodward (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on December 13, 1862, at Fredericksburg, Virginia. His citation reads:

Advanced between the lines, demanded and received the surrender of the 19th Georgia Infantry and captured their battle flag.


Today’s Pic

Here we have a picture of Sonny's daughter (Allison) and his father-in-law Tommy.  I met Tommy many (many) years ago when I was in middle school and Sonny was dating Cougar.  While I was young, I was pretty big (compared to most people around me).  Then  I met Tommy... I don't know how big he actually way, but to me he seemed to be around 10 feet tall.  Over the years I got to spend some time with him (usually before/after Clemson games at his tailgate) and he always treated me so nice.  Someone that size didn't have to be nice to anyone, especially some punk kid.  But Tommy was nice.  He treated me like the son he always wanted (and the son-in-law he wanted Sonny to be).  He died far too soon and I have missed him very much.


Thursday, July 28, 2016

Top 10 Tom Cruise Movies

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Sergeant Alonzo Woodruff (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on October 27, 1864, at Hatchers Run, Virginia. His citation reads:

Went to the assistance of a wounded and overpowered comrade, and in a hand-to-hand encounter effected his rescue.

First Lieutenant Carle A. Woodruff (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on July 24, 1863, at Newbys Crossroads, Virginia. His citation reads:

While in command of a section of a battery constituting a portion of the rear guard of a division then retiring before the advance of a corps of Infantry was attacked by the enemy and ordered to abandon his guns. Lt. Woodruff disregarded the orders received and aided in repelling the attack and saving the guns.

Sergeant Brent Woods (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 19, 1881, in New Mexico. His citation reads:

Saved the lives of his comrades and citizens of the detachment.


Today’s Pic



Top 10 Tom Cruise Movies

10. A Few Good Men (1992) Roll: Lt. Daniel Kaffee; This list wasn’t easy… I had to leave a lot of good movies off this list. I like this one too much to leave it off, though. Cruise did a great job, I think, of a JAG lawyer.

9. Jack Reacher (2012) Roll: Jack Reacher; This movie didn’t get great reviews, but I thought it was great. I think the sequel is coming out later this year.

8. Knight and Day (2010) Roll: Roy Miller; This is an action movie with a lot of laughs… or a comedy with a lot of action. Either way, I like it.

7. Jerry Maguire (1996) Roll: Jerry Maguire; “SHOW ME THE MONEY!!!!!!!!”

6. The Firm (1993) Roll: Mitch McDeere; This movie was adapted from the great John Grisham novel by the same name.

5. Rain Man (1988) Roll: Charlie Babbitt; While the movie is best known for the role Dustin Hoffman played, the story of growth is really about the selfish young jerk of a character played by Tom Cruise learning to love the big brother he never really knew.

4. Days of Thunder (1990) Roll: Cole Trickle; Even if you don’t like NASCAR, you’ll like it after watching this movie.

3. Cocktail (1988) Roll: Brian Flanagan; Who knew bartending was so much fun?

2. Risky Business (1983) Roll: Joel Goodson; This has one of the most well-known lip-synch scenes in movie history.

1. Top Gun (1986) Role: Lt. Pete “Maverick” Mitchell; Tom Cruise was so good in this movie that I wanted to fly jets for the Navy. I hate flying and I hate being so far out on the water that I can’t see land. Think about that…

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Let’s go!!!!!

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Sergeant Eri D. Woodbury (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on October 19, 1864, at Cedar Creek, Virginia. His citation reads:

During the regiment's charge when the enemy was in retreat Sgt. Woodbury encountered 4 Confederate infantrymen retreating. He drew his saber and ordered them to surrender, overcoming by his determined actions their willingness to further resist. They surrendered to him together with their rifles and 12th North Carolina (C.S.A.) regimental flag.

First Lieutenant Samuel Woodfill (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on October 12, 1918, at Cunel, France. His citation reads:

While he was leading his company against the enemy, his line came under heavy machinegun fire, which threatened to hold up the advance. Followed by 2 soldiers at 25 yards, this officer went out ahead of his first line toward a machinegun nest and worked his way around its flank, leaving the 2 soldiers in front. When he got within 10 yards of the gun it ceased firing, and 4 of the enemy appeared, 3 of whom were shot by 1st Lt. Woodfill. The fourth, an officer, rushed at 1st Lt. Woodfill, who attempted to club the officer with his rifle. After a hand-to-hand struggle, 1st Lt. Woodfill killed the officer with his pistol. His company thereupon continued to advance, until shortly afterwards another machinegun nest was encountered. Calling on his men to follow, 1st Lt. Woodfill rushed ahead of his line in the face of heavy fire from the nest, and when several of the enemy appeared above the nest he shot them, capturing 3 other members of the crew and silencing the gun. A few minutes later this officer for the third time demonstrated conspicuous daring by charging another machinegun position, killing 5 men in one machinegun pit with his rifle. He then drew his revolver and started to jump into the pit, when 2 other gunners only a few yards away turned their gun on him. Failing to kill them with his revolver, he grabbed a pick lying nearby and killed both of them. Inspired by the exceptional courage displayed by this officer, his men pressed on to their objective under severe shell and machinegun fire.

Staff Sergeant Howard E. Woodford (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on June 6, 1945, near Tabio, Luzon, Philippine Islands. His citation reads:

He volunteered to investigate the delay in a scheduled attack by an attached guerrilla battalion. Reaching the line of departure, he found that the lead company, in combat for the first time, was immobilized by intense enemy mortar, machinegun, and rifle fire which had caused casualties to key personnel. Knowing that further failure to advance would endanger the flanks of adjacent units, as well as delay capture of the objective, he immediately took command of the company, evacuated the wounded, reorganized the unit under fire, and prepared to attack. He repeatedly exposed himself to draw revealing fire from the Japanese strongpoints, and then moved forward with a 5-man covering force to determine exact enemy positions. Although intense enemy machinegun fire killed 2 and wounded his other 3 men, S/Sgt. Woodford resolutely continued his patrol before returning to the company. Then, against bitter resistance, he guided the guerrillas up a barren hill and captured the objective, personally accounting for 2 hostile machinegunners and courageously reconnoitering strong defensive positions before directing neutralizing fire. After organizing a perimeter defense for the night, he was given permission by radio to return to his battalion, but, feeling that he was needed to maintain proper control, he chose to remain with the guerrillas. Before dawn the next morning the enemy launched a fierce suicide attack with mortars, grenades, and small-arms fire, and infiltrated through the perimeter. Though wounded by a grenade, S/Sgt. Woodford remained at his post calling for mortar support until bullets knocked out his radio. Then, seizing a rifle he began working his way around the perimeter, encouraging the men until he reached a weak spot where 2 guerrillas had been killed. Filling this gap himself, he fought off the enemy. At daybreak he was found dead in his foxhole, but 37 enemy dead were lying in and around his position. By his daring, skillful, and inspiring leadership, as well as by his gallant determination to search out and kill the enemy, S/Sgt. Woodford led an inexperienced unit in capturing and securing a vital objective, and was responsible for the successful continuance of a vitally important general advance.


Today’s Pic

Yes... Yes I do have a lot of pictures of Ethan. I will not apologize for that. Like I told you, he is the cutest baby ever.


I know I’ve said this before, but we are doing great in our fundraising so far! We’ve already shattered our previous July record and still have over a month to go until the 2016 Walk to End Alzheimer’s. If you want to be on the right side of history (as the kids say), then you need to donate now. Heck, this thing is so great that some of you who have already donated may want to donate again. Well, I spoke with my contacts at the Alzheimer’s Association and they said that since I am such a big deal they will allow anyone donating to team I’m just sayin… to donate MULTIPLE times if they want to! How cool is that?! Seriously, we have received a lot of donations from first time donors and from long time donors and we are thankful for all of them. Let’s keep it up. And don’t be shy… tell your friends about our team and give them a chance to donate and feel good about themselves.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Star Trek Movies

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Coxswain Robert B. Wood (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on April 14, 1863, on board the U.S.S. Mount Washington. His citation reads:

Attached to the U.S.S. Minnesota and temporarily serving on the U.S.S. Mount Washington, during action against the enemy in the Nansemond River, 14 April 1863. When the U.S.S. Mount Washington drifted against the bank and all men were driven from the decks by escaping steam following several successive hits which struck her boilers and stopped her engines, Wood boarded the stricken vessel and, despite a strike on the head by a spent ball, continued at his gun for 6 hours as fierce artillery and musketry continued to rake her decks.

Civilian Scout William H. Woodall (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions from March 29 – April 9, 1865, in Virginia, Appomattox campaign, Sailors Creek. His citation reads:

Was Chief Civilian Scout for Major General Philip H. Sheridan's Cavalry Corps, which consisted of VI and XIX Corps. Citation: Captured flag of Brigadier General Rufus Barringer's headquarters brigade. (In 1916, the general review of all Medals of Honor deemed 900 unwarranted. This recipient was one of them. In June 1989, the U.S. Army Board of Correction of Records restored the medal to this recipient.)

Sergeant Zachariah Woodall (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 12, 1874, at Wichita River, Texas. His citation reads:

While in command of 5 men and carrying dispatches, was attacked by 125 Indians, whorr, he with his command fought throughout the day, he being severely wounded.


Today’s Pic



GREAT NEWS!!! You still have time to donate to our Walk to End Alzheimer’s!!!! Click the link up top to do so.

I am often asked what my Top 10 Star Trek Movies are… and by “often asked”, I mean I listed to a podcast yesterday that ranked the top 10 Star Trek movies and thought “That’s a good idea for a blog post tomorrow”. While I have seen all of the Star Trek movies (except for the one currently out), I admit I didn’t realize there 10 of them (much less more than 10). Anyway… let’s get to the list.


Top 10 Star Trek Movies

10. Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979): I’m going to be honest… I’m not a huge fan of the first Star Trek movie. My feelings are typically that the first movie in a series is the best (and rarely do any of the following movies even come close). In this case, the only reason it’s making my list is that it was good enough to kick-start a great series of movies. That… and it’s not like the two movies I’m leaving off the list were the greatest ever.

9. Star Trek Into Darkness (2013): This one is pretty much on the list because I really like the actors playing these rolls. Other than that… this one is too much like another Star Trek movie on this list (but not nearly as good). So it’s good enough to make the list… but not good enough to get past #9.

8. Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989): I had trouble believing this plot… which is saying something for a movie based in outer space. Still, it had enough good moments to land it at #8 on the list. And this movie did give us the great line from Captain Kirk, "What does God need with a starship?"

7. Star Trek: First Contact (1996): I believe this is the first of the Star Trek movies to not have any of the original crew in it. I could be wrong, but I don’t think I am. I thought this one was very good and showed you didn’t have to have past stars to have a great movie.

6. Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991): I thought this was a great movie, especially for its time. I’m not always a fan of political statements being made in movies, but I kind of liked the way this one (in its own way) dealt with the fall of the Soviet Empire. I mean, you didn’t have to be a rocket surgeon to figure out what the movie was trying to say… still, I thought it was good. And I think it captured the mood of a lot of people at the time.

5. Star Trek Generations (1994): This was the first movie to include the cast from Star Trek: The Next Generation. It also gave us a chance to see Captain Kirk and Captain Picard on the screen at the same time.

4. Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984): This movie takes place directly after the second Star Trek film. It gives us a nice look at the main characters as they have to steal the Starship Enterprise to (wait for it… wait for iiiiiiiiiittttttttt……..) search for Spock.

3. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986): This movie gives us another great look at the main cast as they split up at one point in the film. This could very well be one of the funniest Star Trek films with many funny moments.

2. Star Trek (2009): The first of the “reboot” movies. I didn’t really know what to expect when it came out, but I left the theater wanting more. I thought this movie did a great job making me believe these actors playing characters I’ve known and loved for many (many) years were really those characters.

1. Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982): The best part about this one is it really needs no explanation. I’ve yet to meet a Star Trek fan who didn’t consider this to be the best of the group. It very well could be the perfect Star Trek movie. It has the perfect villain and the perfect hero and gave us a great look at the relationship between James T. Kirk and Spock.

Monday, July 25, 2016

Six years…

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Assistant Surgeon Leonard Wood (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions in the summer of 1886, in the Apache campaign. His citation reads:

Voluntarily carried dispatches through a region infested with hostile Indians, making a journey of 70 miles in one night and walking 30 miles the next day. Also for several weeks, while in close pursuit of Geronimo's band and constantly expecting an encounter, commanded a detachment of Infantry, which was then without an officer, and to the command of which he was assigned upon his own request.

Private Mark Wood (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions in April 1862, in Georgia. His citation reads:

One of the 19 of 22 men (including 2 civilians), who, by direction of Gen. Mitchell (or Buell), penetrated nearly 200 miles south into enemy territory and captured a railroad train at Big Shanty, Ga., and attempted to destroy the bridges and track between Chattanooga and Atlanta.

Captain Richard H. Wood (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Mississippi. His citation reads:

Led the "volunteer storming party," which made a most gallant assault upon the enemy's works.


Today’s Pic


Susie's hand on top of MaMa's hand... The last time Susie saw MaMa (and one of the last times I saw her). Before this picture was taken, The Wife was holding Susie (who wasn't even 1 yet) and telling her to wave.  MaMa was waving and we were all telling Susie to wave, but Susie was just sitting there looking at MaMa.  Then I looked at her hand that was behind The Wife and saw that it was waving like crazy.  It still makes me laugh thinking about it.

The calendar, if such things are to be believed, shows that it has been six years since MaMa died. How is this possible? How have I made it six years without her here to protect and advise me? Sure, she waited to leave us until I was bigger than everyone else in the family… so that might help explain how I’ve made it this long without her protection. And yes, I do still have Mom and Dad to help in the advice department… but when I look back on my childhood and the things they let me do… I’m not sure I can trust all of their advice. And when it comes to kids, Dad’s favorite thing to tell me is that my kids are a lot smarter than his kids were. Which I’m sure is true (all 3 of my kids talk), but he can’t offer me too much advise because things are so different now than when he had children in the house. For example, Dad controlled the TV when I was growing up. I was in college before I realized old Western’s weren’t the only thing on TV on Saturdays or that something other than Braves baseball games were on at 7:05 pm from April to September. These days, the kids (with the backing of The Wife) control the TV. I know far too much about the TV shows on the Disney Channel (or Disney XD). God help me if I want to watch a TV show that’s rated PG-13 with the kids still up. Apparently, telling them to cover their eyes (or ears) doesn’t work in 2016 like it did in 1986…

Sunday, July 24, 2016

Pics from Teresa Lynn's house

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Private John Wollam (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions in April 1862, in Georgia. His citation reads:

One of the 19 of 22 men (including 2 civilians), who, by direction of Gen. Mitchell (or Buell), penetrated nearly 200 miles south into enemy territory and captured a railroad train at Big Shanty, Ga., and attempted to destroy the bridges and track between Chattanooga and Atlanta.

Private First Class Bryant H. Womack (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on March 12, 1952, near Sokso-ri, Korea. His citation reads:

Pfc. Womack distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. Pfc. Womack was the only medical aid man attached to a night combat patrol when sudden contact with a numerically superior enemy produced numerous casualties. Pfc. Womack went immediately to their aid, although this necessitated exposing himself to a devastating hail of enemy fire, during which he was seriously wounded. Refusing medical aid for himself, he continued moving among his comrades to administer aid. While he was aiding 1 man, he was again struck by enemy mortar fire, this time suffering the loss of his right arm. Although he knew the consequences should immediate aid not be administered, he still refused aid and insisted that all efforts be made for the benefit of others that were wounded. Although unable to perform the task himself, he remained on the scene and directed others in first aid techniques. The last man to withdraw, he walked until he collapsed from loss of blood, and died a few minutes later while being carried by his comrades. The extraordinary heroism, outstanding courage, and unswerving devotion to his duties displayed by Pfc. Womack reflect the utmost distinction upon himself and uphold the esteemed traditions of the U.S. Army.

First Lieutenant H. Clay Wood (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 10, 1861, at Wilsons Creek, Missouri. His citation reads:

Distinguished gallantry.


Today’s Pic

Colt hasn't met Gertrude yet... He might never meet her.


Below are some pictures from the time we spent a Teresa Lynn’s house a couple of Saturday’s ago. It was very fun…

By the way, SUSIE HAS GLASSES!!!!!!!!!!!

Mom and Beauregard taking a nap at Teresa Lynn's house

Me, Mom, Aunt Yvonne and Louis...

Me and the Kids

Beasley to the rescue!!!!!!


Saturday, July 23, 2016

Meet Gertrude

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Private First Class Frank Peter Witek (US Marine Corps) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 3, 1944, at Guam, Marianas. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 1st Battalion, 9th Marines, 3d Marine Division, during the Battle of Finegayen at Guam, Marianas, on 3 August 1944. When his rifle platoon was halted by heavy surprise fire from well-camouflaged enemy positions, Pfc. Witek daringly remained standing to fire a full magazine from his automatic at point-blank range into a depression housing Japanese troops, killing 8 of the enemy and enabling the greater part of his platoon to take cover. During his platoon's withdrawal for consolidation of lines, he remained to safeguard a severely wounded comrade, courageously returning the enemy's fire until the arrival of stretcher bearers, and then covering the evacuation by sustained fire as he moved backward toward his own lines. With his platoon again pinned down by a hostile machinegun, Pfc. Witek, on his own initiative, moved forward boldly to the reinforcing tanks and infantry, alternately throwing handgrenades and firing as he advanced to within 5 to 10 yards of the enemy position, and destroying the hostile machinegun emplacement and an additional 8 Japanese before he himself was struck down by an enemy rifleman. His valiant and inspiring action effectively reduced the enemy's firepower, thereby enabling his platoon to attain its objective, and reflects the highest credit upon Pfc. Witek and the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

Captain William H. Withington (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on July 21, 1861, at Bull Run, Virginia. His citation reads:

Remained on the field under heavy fire to succor his superior officer.

Private Nels Wold (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 26, 1918, near Cheppy, France. His citation reads:

He rendered most gallant service in aiding the advance of his company, which had been held up by machinegun nests, advancing, with 1 other soldier, and silencing the guns, bringing with him, upon his return, 11 prisoners. Later the same day he jumped from a trench and rescued a comrade who was about to be shot by a German officer, killing the officer during the exploit. His actions were entirely voluntary, and it was while attempting to rush a 5th machinegun nest that he was killed. The advance of his company was mainly due to his great courage and devotion to duty.


Today’s Pic

Cutest baby ever (he took the title from me)


About a week ago, a kitten started sleeping under my car. I was happy to live and let live (or, truth be told, live and let die). I told The Wife to leave it alone and let the mother come back to take care of it. She wanted to keep the kitten, but I told her (very clearly) that under no circumstances would we be keeping that cat. Sure, we plan on having an outside cat when we move to our new house… but we aren’t there yet. Anyway, she wanted to keep it and I said “no”, so we compromised and decided we would keep it until it runs away or dies. We also named it after my paternal grandfather’s oldest sister, Gertrude. Below are videos and pictures of the newest member of our family… (who, I hope, will one day take over for Maverick in the “outside warrior” department). Speaking of… Maverick doesn’t seem to mind Gertrude. I wouldn’t say he’s a huge fan, but I think he knows this is best chance at training someone to protect us when he’s gone (since, sadly, we know it won’t be Scooby). Scooby, for his part, is scared of Gertrude. It might be that he thinks she is the ugliest puppy ever… but he’s whatever the reason he’s scared.





Maverick inspecting Gertrude

Scooby, checking to see if Gertrude is ok.

He's also making sure she isn't about to come in the house and beat him up

Susie holding Gertrude like a baby

Gertrude and The Wife

Friday, July 22, 2016

Coloring…

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Staff Sergeant Homer L. Wise (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on June 14, 1944, at Magliano, Italy. His citation reads:

While his platoon was pinned down by enemy small-arms fire from both flanks, he left his position of comparative safety and assisted in carrying 1 of his men, who had been seriously wounded and who lay in an exposed position, to a point where he could receive medical attention. The advance of the platoon was resumed but was again stopped by enemy frontal fire. A German officer and 2 enlisted men, armed with automatic weapons, threatened the right flank. Fearlessly exposing himself, he moved to a position from which he killed all 3 with his submachinegun. Returning to his squad, he obtained an Ml rifle and several antitank grenades, then took up a position from which he delivered accurate fire on the enemy holding up the advance. As the battalion moved forward it was again stopped by enemy frontal and flanking fire. He procured an automatic rifle and, advancing ahead of his men, neutralized an enemy machinegun with his fire. When the flanking fire became more intense he ran to a nearby tank and exposing himself on the turret, restored a jammed machinegun to operating efficiency and used it so effectively that the enemy fire from an adjacent ridge was materially reduced thus permitting the battalion to occupy its objective.

First Lieutenant Lewis S. Wisner (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 12, 1864, at Spotsylvania, Virginia. His citation reads:

While serving as an engineer officer voluntarily exposed himself to the enemy's fire.

Private Joseph Witcome (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions from August to October 1868, in Arizona. His citation reads:

Bravery in scouts and actions against Indians.


Today’s Pic

The Wife and Susie playing with The Wife's coloring books...


I’ve been rather busy at work, so I haven’t had any time to think about what I want to talk about… so I’m just going to leave you with a picture today. That, and a promise that I will be back tomorrow and the days following to share memories and some thoughts on current issues. Until then, I hope you have a good (safe) day.

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Happy Time…

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Bugler Claron A. Windus (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on July 12, 1870, at Wichita River, Texas. His citation reads:

Gallantry in action.

Lieutenant William W. Winegar (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on April 1, 1865, at Five Forks, Virginia. His citation reads:

While advancing in front of his company and alone, he found himself surrounded by the enemy. He accosted a nearby enemy flag_bearer demanding the surrender of the group. His effective firing of one shot so demoralized the unit that it surrendered with flag.

Sergeant William Winterbottom (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on July 12, 1870, at PLACE. His citation reads:

Gallantry in action.


Today’s Pic



The pic today is from one of my favorite memories… our family trip to Disney World. This particular picture was from our first day at Magic Kingdom as we waited for Mickey Mouse to come out and welcome us to the park. If you ever have the chance to take young kids to Disney World… do it. I hope they remember it, but even if they don’t I know I’ll always remember it.

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Wednesday, July 20, 2016

More Basketball…

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Private First Class David F. Winder (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 13, 1970, in the Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

Pfc. Winder distinguished himself while serving in the Republic of Vietnam as a senior medical aidman with Company A. After moving through freshly cut rice paddies in search of a suspected company-size enemy force, the unit started a thorough search of the area. Suddenly they were engaged with intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fire by a well entrenched enemy force. Several friendly soldiers fell wounded in the initial contact and the unit was pinned down. Responding instantly to the cries of his wounded comrades, Pfc. Winder began maneuvering across approximately 100 meters of open, bullet-swept terrain toward the nearest casualty. Unarmed and crawling most of the distance, he was wounded by enemy fire before reaching his comrades. Despite his wounds and with great effort, Pfc. Winder reached the first casualty and administered medical aid. As he continued to crawl across the open terrain toward a second wounded soldier he was forced to stop when wounded a second time. Aroused by the cries of an injured comrade for aid, Pfc. Winder's great determination and sense of duty impelled him to move forward once again, despite his wounds, in a courageous attempt to reach and assist the injured man. After struggling to within 10 meters of the man, Pfc. Winder was mortally wounded. His dedication and sacrifice inspired his unit to initiate an aggressive counterassault which led to the defeat of the enemy. Pfc. Winder's conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the cost of his life were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit and the U.S. Army.

Private Charles Windolph (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on June 25-26, 1876, at Little Big Horn, Montana. His citation reads:

With 3 comrades, during the entire engagement, courageously held a position that secured water for the command.

Staff Sergeant William G. Windrich (US Marine Corps) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on December 1, 1950, at Vicinity of Yudam-ni, Korea. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as a platoon sergeant of Company I, in action against enemy aggressor forces the night of 1 December 1950. Promptly organizing a squad of men when the enemy launched a sudden, vicious counterattack against the forward elements of his company's position, rendering it untenable, S/Sgt. Windrich, armed with a carbine, spearheaded the assault to the top of the knoll immediately confronting the overwhelming forces and, under shattering hostile automatic-weapons, mortar, and grenade fire, directed effective fire to hold back the attackers and cover the withdrawal of our troops to commanding ground. With 7 of his men struck down during the furious action and himself wounded in the head by a bursting grenade, he made his way to his company's position and, organizing a small group of volunteers, returned with them to evacuate the wounded and dying from the frozen hillside, staunchly refusing medical attention himself. Immediately redeploying the remainder of his troops, S/Sgt. Windrich placed them on the left flank of the defensive sector before the enemy again attacked in force. Wounded in the leg during the bitter fight that followed, he bravely fought on with his men, shouting words of encouragement and directing their fire until the attack was repelled. Refusing evacuation although unable to stand, he still continued to direct his platoon in setting up defensive positions until weakened by the bitter cold, excessive loss of blood, and severe pain, he lapsed into unconsciousness and died. His valiant leadership, fortitude, and courageous fighting spirit against tremendous odds served to inspire others to heroic endeavor in holding the objective and reflect the highest credit upon S/Sgt. Windrich and the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Today’s Pic



I was asked the other day by Jeremy who my All-Time NBA Team would be. And by “asked by Jeremy”, I mean I said “Do you want to hear who my All-Time NBA Team would be?” and then I started talking without waiting for him to answer. The difficult thing, of course, is that you only get 5 spots on this team. And since it’s a team, I’m going to do it by position (so I’m not going to have 5 centers or 5 guards). For me, Center is probably the most difficult to pick. I’m going with Bill Russell, but others I looked at closely are Wilt Chamberlain, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Hakeem Olajuwon. Kareem maybe the most underrated of the group. At forward, I have Larry Bird and LeBron James. Others I wanted to have on here were Tim Duncan, Dr. J, Dennis Rodman, James Worthy and Dominique Wilkins. The next two positions were easy for me (though I still had to leave some great players off the team). For my shooting guard I have a fella out of North Carolina named Michael Jordan. For my point guard I have the man I consider the greatest player ever (and my second favorite player ever behind Charles Oakley) Magic Johnson. Others guards I wish I had room for were Jerry West, Oscar Robertson, Kobe Bryant, Isiah Thomas, Walt Frazier, Ray Allen and Allen Iverson and Jason Kidd.

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Basketball…

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Sergeant William Wilson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on March 28, 1872, at Colorado Valley, Texas. His citation reads:

In pursuit of a band of cattle thieves from New Mexico. SECOND AWARD Place and date: At Red River, Tex., 29 September 1872. Citation: Distinguished conduct in action with Indians, Red River, Tex.

Corporal William O. Wilson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions in 1890, during the Sioux Campaign. His citation reads:

Bravery.

Brigadier General Roswell Winans (US Marine Corps) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on July 3, 1916, at Guayacanas, Dominican Republic. His citation reads:

During an engagement at Guavacanas on 3 July 1916, 1st Sgt. Winans participated in action against a considerable force of rebels on the line of march. During a running fight of 1,200 yards, our forces reached the enemy entrenchments and Cpl. Joseph A. Gowin, U.S.M.C., placed the machinegun, of which he had charge, behind a large log across the road and immediately opened fire on the trenches. He was struck once but continued firing his gun, but a moment later he was again struck and had to be dragged out of the position into cover. 1st Sgt. Winans, U.S.M.C., then arrived with a Colt's gun which he placed in a most exposed position, coolly opened fire on the trenches and when the gun jammed, stood up and repaired it under fire. All the time Glowin and Winans were handling their guns they were exposed to a very heavy fire which was striking into the logs and around the men, 7 men being wounded and 1 killed within 20 feet. 1st Sgt. Winans continued flring his gun until the enemy had abandoned the trenches.


Today’s Pic



I don’t believe I’ve talked about this as much as I should, but I’ve got to say I was proud of Mary Ruth this past basketball season. For playing in her first season, I thought she did a great job and improved over the season. I feel bad, because I didn’t work with her nearly enough at home… so all of her improvement was based off of playing on Saturday and practicing on Tuesday. She had great coaches, so that helped (of course). Aside from how she did, I was very pleased with her desire to win. Too often I think we downplay winning because we don’t want to hurt feelings, but winning is good. And it’s good to want to win. So I’m happy that Mary Ruth wanted to win and I’m happy she had fun playing. I look forward to watching her play in the future.

As you know, I played a little ball myself back in the day. The first year I played basketball, I was one of two white players (along with my friend Zach) in the league. It’s an interesting feeling to look around and see a lot of people who don’t look like you (kind of like how Tim Scott must feel in the Senate). Still, sports are an area where I honestly believe the only color that really matters is the color of your uniform. We had a good season that year, though I can’t remember if we won the championship or not (my guess is we didn’t, but I could be wrong). My year of basketball saw me and Zach playing in the same league, but with a team from James Island that had a few more players who looked like us. I do remember we won the championship that season. After that, Zach moved away and I decided to take my talents to Ashley River Baptist Church (because I knew they wouldn’t cut me). My first season with ARBC, we had six players on the team and only two of us had previously played basketball. We were short and couldn’t jump, but we made up for it by shooting poorly and not playing great defense. We were able to complete the season without a win and I doubt we ever got within 20 points in any of our losses. There were some games we had guys foul out leaving us with fewer than 5 guys on the court at the end of the game. In one game, we were down to 3 players and the other team kept the full court press on. Still, I have good memories from that season. You learn a lot when you go through a lot of losing like that (mainly, you learn that you don’t want to go through a lot of losing like that). After that, we got better players. But I’m proud to say that every player on our team had to attend church on Sunday or they couldn’t play on Saturday. I can’t say for sure, but I’m 99% sure we had 3 or 4 guys who only came to church so they could play basketball. To me, that means the team was successful. We also won more games after that first season. We never won a championship, but we won enough to make it fun. I started my career at ARBC as the starting point guard and ended as the starting power forward. I got better over my career, but Mary Ruth will probably be better than I ever was in a couple of years.

Monday, July 18, 2016

Fear in Maverick’s eyes…

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Sergeant Milden H. Wilson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 9, 1877, at Big Hole, Montana. His citation reads:

Gallantry in forming company from line of skirmishers and deploying again under a galling fire, and in carrying dispatches at the imminent risk of his life.

Private First Class Richard G. Wilson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on October 21, 1950, at Opari, Korea. His citation reads:

Pfc. Wilson distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action. As medical aid man attached to Company I, he accompanied the unit during a reconnaissance in force through the hilly country near Opari. The main body of the company was passing through a narrow valley flanked on 3 sides by high hills when the enemy laid down a barrage of mortar, automatic-weapons and small-arms fire. The company suffered a large number of casualties from the intense hostile fire while fighting its way out of the ambush. Pfc. Wilson proceeded at once to move among the wounded and administered aid to them oblivious of the danger to himself, constantly exposing himself to hostile fire. The company commander ordered a withdrawal as the enemy threatened to encircle and isolate the company. As his unit withdrew Private Wilson assisted wounded men to safety and assured himself that none were left behind. After the company had pulled back he learned that a comrade previously thought dead had been seen to be moving and attempting to crawl to safety. Despite the protests of his comrades, unarmed and facing a merciless enemy, Pfc. Wilson returned to the dangerous position in search of his comrade. Two days later a patrol found him lying beside the man he returned to aid. He had been shot several times while trying to shield and administer aid to the wounded man. Pfc. Wilson's superb personal bravery, consummate courage and willing self-sacrifice for his comrades reflect untold glory upon himself and uphold the esteemed traditions of the military service.

Private First Class Robert Lee Wilson (US Marine Corps) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 4, 1944, on Tinian Island, Marianas Group. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 2d Battalion, 6th Marines, 2d Marine Division, during action against enemy Japanese forces at Tinian Island, Marianas Group, on 4 August 1944. As 1 of a group of marines advancing through heavy underbrush to neutralize isolated points of resistance, Pfc. Wilson daringly preceded his companions toward a pile of rocks where Japanese troops were supposed to be hiding. Fully aware of the danger involved, he was moving forward while the remainder of the squad, armed with automatic rifles, closed together in the rear when an enemy grenade landed in the midst of the group. Quick to act, Pfc. Wilson cried a warning to the men and unhesitatingly threw himself on the grenade, heroically sacrificing his own life that the others might live and fulfill their mission. His exceptional valor, his courageous loyalty and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave peril reflect the highest credit upon Pfc. Wilson and the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.


Today’s Pic

Colt asking The Wife if she was going to eat the rest of that sandwich...

So Maverick woke me up a little after midnight because he had to use the bathroom. I got up and let him out and went ahead and stepped outside (in hopes of being able to keep him from going off and exploring after doing his business). It was raining a little, but nothing too bad. It was dark outside, but I was able to still see Maverick get done doing his business and start to go on “patrol”. I started to call him and go into the yard to get him when, out of nowhere (ie, no previous thunder), there was a bright flash (like a powerful flashlight being turned on right in your face) followed by thunder (though, to be honest, the thunder wasn’t as instant as I expected for as bright as the lightening was). The lightening was bright enough and sudden enough that it took my eyes a minute to readjust to the darkness. Once I was able to see again I started looking in the yard for Maverick. Before I could take a step, I hear him (behind me) bark. I turn around and see my warrior dog, who usually takes about 5 minutes to climb the steps to our backdoor, standing at the door looking at me like I was crazy for being out there. So I guess there is something that Maverick is scared off. Not that I blame him…

Sunday, July 17, 2016

Beasley the rescue dog… even if you don’t need to be rescued

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Private John A. Wilson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions in April 1862, in Georgia. His citation reads:

One of the 19 of 22 men (including 2 civilians) who, by direction of Gen. Mitchell (or Buell), penetrated nearly 200 miles south into enemy territory and captured a railroad train at Big Shanty, Ga., and attempted to destroy the bridges and track between Chattanooga and Atlanta.

First Lieutenant John M. Wilson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 6, 1862, at Malvern Hill, Virginia. His citation reads:

Remained on duty, while suffering from an acute illness and very weak, and participated in the action of that date. A few days previous he had been transferred to a staff corps, but preferred to remain until the close of the campaign, taking part in several actions.

Captain Louis Hugh Wilson, Jr. (US Marine Corps) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on July 25-26, 1944, at Fonte Hill, Guam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of a rifle company attached to the 2d Battalion, 9th Marines, 3d Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces at Fonte Hill, Guam, 25-26 July 1944. Ordered to take that portion of the hill within his zone of action, Capt. Wilson initiated his attack in mid-afternoon, pushed up the rugged, open terrain against terrific machinegun and rifle fire for 300 yards and successfully captured the objective. Promptly assuming command of other disorganized units and motorized equipment in addition to his own company and 1 reinforcing platoon, he organized his night defenses in the face of continuous hostile fire and, although wounded 3 times during this 5-hour period, completed his disposition of men and guns before retiring to the company command post for medical attention. Shortly thereafter, when the enemy launched the first of a series of savage counterattacks lasting all night, he voluntarily rejoined his besieged units and repeatedly exposed himself to the merciless hail of shrapnel and bullets, dashing 50 yards into the open on 1 occasion to rescue a wounded marine Iying helpless beyond the frontlines. Fighting fiercely in hand-to-hand encounters, he led his men in furiously waged battle for approximately 10 hours, tenaciously holding his line and repelling the fanatically renewed counterthrusts until he succeeded in crushing the last efforts of the hard-pressed Japanese early the following morning. Then organizing a 17-man patrol, he immediately advanced upon a strategic slope essential to the security of his position and, boldly defying intense mortar, machinegun, and rifle fire which struck down 13 of his men, drove relentlessly forward with the remnants of his patrol to seize the vital ground. By his indomitable leadership, daring combat tactics, and valor in the face of overwhelming odds, Capt. Wilson succeeded in capturing and holding the strategic high ground in his regimental sector, thereby contributing essentially to the success of his regimental mission and to the annihilation of 350 Japanese troops. His inspiring conduct throughout the critical periods of this decisive action sustains and enhances the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.


Today’s Pic




The above picture is of Teresa Lynn’s dog, Beasley. It was taken at a family gathering (last year, I think) and shows Beasley diving into the pool to rescue my cousin Alan (who, as it just so happens, did not need to be rescued). I’m not sure what it is that makes Beasley think he could rescue anyone… but I suppose if someone was drowning, Beasley could (and would) swim circles around that person and bark until help came. It would help (and probably be more effective) if he only did this when a person was in trouble, but it’s better than nothing. And it is fun watching him jump into the pool…

Saturday, July 16, 2016

HAPPY BIRTHDAY JANIE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Corporal Francis A. Wilson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on April 2, 1865, at Petersburg, Virginia. His citation reads:

Was among the first to penetrate the enemy's lines and himself captured a gun of the 2 batteries captured.

Technical Sergeant Harold E. Wilson (US Marine Corps) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on April 23-24, 1951, in Korea. His citation reads:

For gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as platoon sergeant of a rifle platoon attached to Company G, in action against enemy aggressor forces on the night of 23-24 April 1951. When the company outpost was overrun by the enemy while his platoon, firing from hastily constructed foxholes, was engaged in resisting the brunt of a fierce mortar, machine gun, grenade, and small-arms attack launched by hostile forces from high ground under cover of darkness, T/Sgt. Wilson braved intense fire to assist the survivors back into the line and to direct the treatment of casualties. Although twice wounded by gunfire, in the right arm and the left leg, he refused medical aid for himself and continued to move about among his men, shouting words of encouragement. After receiving further wounds in the head and shoulder as the attack increased in intensity, he again insisted upon remaining with his unit. Unable to use either arm to fire, and with mounting casualties among our forces, he resupplied his men with rifles and ammunition taken from the wounded. Personally reporting to his company commander on several occasions, he requested and received additional assistance when the enemy attack became even more fierce and, after placing the reinforcements in strategic positions in the line, directed effective fire until blown off his feet by the bursting of a hostile mortar round in his face. Dazed and suffering from concussion, he still refused medical aid and, despite weakness from loss of blood, moved from foxhole to foxhole, directing fire, resupplying ammunition, rendering first aid, and encouraging his men. By his heroic actions in the face of almost certain death, when the unit's ability to hold the disadvantageous position was doubtful, he instilled confidence in his troops, inspiring them to rally repeatedly and turn back the furious assaults. At dawn, after the final attack had been repulsed, he personally accounted for each man in his platoon before walking unassisted l/2 mile to the aid station where he submitted to treatment. His outstanding courage, initiative, and skilled leadership in the face of overwhelming odds were contributing factors in the success of his company's mission and reflect the highest credit upon T/Sgt. Wilson and the U.S. Naval Service.

Sergeant John Wilson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on March 31, 1865, at Chamberlains Creek, Virginia. His citation reads:

With the assistance of one comrade, headed off the advance of the enemy, shooting 2 of his color bearers; also posted himself between the enemy and the lead horses of his own command, thus saving the herd from capture.


Today’s Pic


Like all of my best ideas, this one kind of started as a joke...

I would like to wish my Labor Day Aunt Janie a VERY HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!!!!!!!!!!!! Back in 2014 I broke the story that Janie would be running for President in 2016. It started as a joke… but I’m convinced now more than ever that if Janie were to run, she would have a good shot at winning. The way things stand right now, she could get a significant number of write-in votes just from people who read my blog. Anyway, I hope Janie has a GREAT birthday and I trust that even when she is in office, we will still find a way to get together over the Labor Day Weekend.


Speaking of Janie, I am reminded of when I was leaving James Island headed to Rock Hill to start my time at Winthrop University. Going off to college can be somewhat of a stressful time to someone like me who 1. Already likes where he’s at and 2. Doesn’t like making new friends. One of the things that helped keep me from being overcome with stress (other than a God given gift of not stressing too much over stuff) is the simple fact that I had Aunt Janie and Not Aunt Janie (I can’t remember if I’m allowed to use her name on the internet or not) in my life. What do I mean by that? I mean when Mom left Knightsville back in the 20’s or 30’s (I don’t remember the exact year she went to college) to head to Columbia College, she was not going with life-long friends. Yet, what happened when she got there was she was put in a unique situation of having not one roommate, but two. Who knew back then that 90 years later (give or take a few years… like I said, I’m not big on dates) these three women would still be great friends and that multiple generations of their families would share decades of happy memories and a great love of Mom’s youngest son? Yet that is what happened. Of course, at the time I was leaving for Winthrop we didn’t have the 3rd generation of our Labor Day family, but the fact that I had a Labor Day family gave me comfort. And while it didn’t happen right away, I did end up making life-long friends (and meeting The Wife) while at Winthrop. So, again, Happy Birthday Janie! We at I’m just sayin… love you (and will most likely be voting for you in November)!

Friday, July 15, 2016

Lucy in the car…

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Sergeant Charles E. Wilson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on April 6, 1865, at Sailors Creek, Virginia. His citation reads:

Charged the enemy's works, colors in hand, and had 2 horses shot from under him.

Corporal Charles Wilson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions from October 21, 1876 – January 8, 1877, at Cedar Creek, etc., Montana. His citation reads:

Gallantry in action.

Private Christopher W. Wilson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 12, 1864, at Spotsylvania, Virginia. His citation reads:

Took the flag from the wounded color bearer and carried it in the charge over the Confederate works, in which charge he also captured the colors of the 56th Virginia (C.S.A.) bringing off both flags in safety.


Today’s Pic


Sweet Lucy...

My sweet Lucy died over five years ago, but sometimes a memory will pop into my head and make me smile. As I’m sure you remember, Lucy was our first child (a pitbull/boxer mix who we adopted after Labor Day in 2002. She was a sweet girl who without a doubt loved me more than she loved The Wife. It’s not that they didn’t get along (though there were some… disagreements… here and there), it’s just that she loved me more. What can I say… she was a daddy’s girl. This particular memory is of how Lucy acted in the car. When she was in the car with me, Lucy would sit in the front seat and would look out the window as I drove. She loved it. When she was in the car with The Wife driving, Lucy would curl up into a tight ball on the floor in the back and tightly shut her eyes. Having been in a car with The Wife driving, I completely understand how Lucy felt. I’m just sayin…

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Sleepovers

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Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Boilermaker August Wilson (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on July 1, 1897, on board the U.S.S. Puritan. His citation reads:

For gallant conduct while serving on board the U.S.S. Puritan and at the time of the collapse of one of the crown sheets of boiler E on that vessel, 1 July 1897. Wrapping wet cloths about his face and arms, Wilson entered the fireroom and opened the safety valve, thus removing the danger of disabling the other boilers.

Private Benjamin Wilson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on October 5, 1870, at Wichita River, Texas. His citation reads:

Gallantry in action.

First Lieutenant Benjamin F. Wilson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on June 5, 1951, near Hwach'on-Myon, Korea. His citation reads:

1st Lt. Wilson distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and indomitable courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. Company I was committed to attack and secure commanding terrain stubbornly defended by a numerically superior hostile force emplaced in well-fortified positions. When the spearheading element was pinned down by withering hostile fire, he dashed forward and, firing his rifle and throwing grenades, neutralized the position denying the advance and killed 4 enemy soldiers manning submachineguns. After the assault platoon moved up, occupied the position, and a base of fire was established, he led a bayonet attack which reduced the objective and killed approximately 27 hostile soldiers. While friendly forces were consolidating the newly won gain, the enemy launched a counterattack and 1st Lt. Wilson, realizing the imminent threat of being overrun, made a determined lone-man charge, killing 7 and wounding 2 of the enemy, and routing the remainder in disorder. After the position was organized, he led an assault carrying to approximately 15 yards of the final objective, when enemy fire halted the advance. He ordered the platoon to withdraw and, although painfully wounded in this action, remained to provide covering fire. During an ensuing counterattack, the commanding officer and 1st Platoon leader became casualties. Unhesitatingly, 1st Lt. Wilson charged the enemy ranks and fought valiantly, killing 3 enemy soldiers with his rifle before it was wrested from his hands, and annihilating 4 others with his entrenching tool. His courageous delaying action enabled his comrades to reorganize and effect an orderly withdrawal. While directing evacuation of the wounded, he suffered a second wound, but elected to remain on the position until assured that all of the men had reached safety. 1st Lt. Wilson's sustained valor and intrepid actions reflect utmost credit upon himself and uphold the honored traditions of the military service.


Today’s Pic


Aunt Yvonne with her favorite child and Susan...


I didn’t participate in many sleepovers when I was growing up. I can probably count on one hand the number of times I slept at a friend’s house and I’m not sure I ever had a friend sleep at my house. Maybe I did, but it wasn’t common enough for me to remember. I did, however, spend the night a good bit at Aunt Yvonne and Uncle George’s house (as well as MaMa and Da’s house and Granny’s house [which was really Aunt Sister’s house]/apartment). Of course, there was also usually a week each summer that would find me at Uncle Keith and Aunt JoJo’s house. And then there was that one summer I spent a week in Georgia with Jim and Deeny working out in the fields from sunup to sundown (before Georgia passed Child Labor laws). I have good memories of all of these… well… most of these, that I will probably share over the next few weeks. Today, however, I’d like to share a specific memory of spending the night at Aunt Yvonne and Uncle George’s house. I don’t remember how old I was at the time of this memory, but I would guess still pretty young (8 or 9?). At that age, Louis and I would sleep on the sofa-sleeper they had whenever I’d spend the night. One thing we liked to do at bed time, was get in the sofa with our pillows and act like we were in a fort. It was fun… and usually we’d climb back up and get on the mattress when we were ready to sleep. One time, though, I remember we fell asleep in the sofa… so that when Aunt Yvonne looked in the room, she didn’t see us. I’m not sure how long it took her to find us, but I do remember her telling us Uncle George had to pull us out while we were sleeping and it wasn’t an easy thing for him to do. We may have been a little younger than 8, I’m not sure. I just remember we were small enough at the time for both of us to fit in there. And I remember it was fun.